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The Impact of Food Price Shocks on Consumption and Nutritional Patterns of Urban Mexican Households

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  • Juarez-Torres, Miriam

Abstract

During the 2000s, recurrent food price shocks in Mexico modified consumption and nutritional patterns of households. This research quantifies the impacts of food price shocks on the purchase of nutrients and on the weight gain of children in urban Mexican households. We find differentiated patterns of food consumption across income quintiles, which result in heterogeneous effects of price shocks on the purchase of nutrients and on weight gain according to age and sex in children. In particular, cereal price shocks are more detrimental and more regressive than price shocks on other categories like meats, vegetables or beverages.

Suggested Citation

  • Juarez-Torres, Miriam, 2015. "The Impact of Food Price Shocks on Consumption and Nutritional Patterns of Urban Mexican Households," 2015 Conference, August 9-14, 2015, Milan, Italy 211818, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:iaae15:211818
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    Cited by:

    1. Rita Motzigkeit Gonzalez, 2016. "Welfare effects of changed prices The “Tortilla Crisis" revisited," Working Papers 167, Bavarian Graduate Program in Economics (BGPE).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety; Food Security and Poverty;

    JEL classification:

    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis
    • C31 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Cross-Sectional Models; Spatial Models; Treatment Effect Models; Quantile Regressions; Social Interaction Models
    • O12 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Microeconomic Analyses of Economic Development

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