IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/ags/iaae06/25353.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Agricultural Productivity Growth in the European Union and Transition Countries

Author

Listed:
  • Lissitsa, Alexej
  • Rungsuriyawiboon, Supawat

Abstract

Economic reform in the Central and Eastern European countries in the 1980s helped transform the structure and volume of agricultural production, consumption and trade, and resulted in significant agricultural productivity improvements. However, there are large differences among the transition countries in the magnitude and direction of these changes. The main objective of this study is to measure and compare the levels and trends in agricultural productivity in transition countries with those of the European Union (EU) countries making use of the most recent data available from the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO). This study employs a parametric distance function approach to measure Malmquist productivity index as well as the magnitude and direction of technical change. The Malmquist productivity index is decomposed into technical change (TC), technical efficiency change (TEC) and scale efficiency change (SEC) in which TC is decomposed into input- and output- biased TC. These measures provide insightful information for researchers in designing policies to achieve a high growth rate in transition countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Lissitsa, Alexej & Rungsuriyawiboon, Supawat, 2006. "Agricultural Productivity Growth in the European Union and Transition Countries," 2006 Annual Meeting, August 12-18, 2006, Queensland, Australia 25353, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:iaae06:25353
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/25353
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. O'Donnell, Christopher J. & Coelli, Timothy J., 2005. "A Bayesian approach to imposing curvature on distance functions," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 126(2), pages 493-523, June.
    2. Battese, George E. & Corra, Greg S., 1977. "Estimation Of A Production Frontier Model: With Application To The Pastoral Zone Of Eastern Australia," Australian Journal of Agricultural Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 21(03), December.
    3. Ray, Subhash C & Desli, Evangelia, 1997. "Productivity Growth, Technical Progress, and Efficiency Change in Industrialized Countries: Comment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 87(5), pages 1033-1039, December.
    4. Hayami, Yujiro & Ruttan, Vernon W, 1970. "Agricultural Productivity Differences Among Countries," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 60(5), pages 895-911, December.
    5. Tim J. Coelli & D. S. Prasada Rao, 2005. "Total factor productivity growth in agriculture: a Malmquist index analysis of 93 countries, 1980-2000," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 32(s1), pages 115-134, January.
    6. Luis Orea, 2002. "Parametric Decomposition of a Generalized Malmquist Productivity Index," Journal of Productivity Analysis, Springer, vol. 18(1), pages 5-22, July.
    7. Fulginiti, Lilyan E. & Perrin, Richard K., 1997. "LDC agriculture: Nonparametric Malmquist productivity indexes," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(2), pages 373-390, August.
    8. Fare, Rolf & Shawna Grosskopf & Mary Norris & Zhongyang Zhang, 1994. "Productivity Growth, Technical Progress, and Efficiency Change in Industrialized Countries," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(1), pages 66-83, March.
    9. Diewert, W. E., 1976. "Exact and superlative index numbers," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 4(2), pages 115-145, May.
    10. Fare, Rolf & Grosskopf, Shawna & Norris, Mary, 1997. "Productivity Growth, Technical Progress, and Efficiency Change in Industrialized Countries: Reply," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 87(5), pages 1040-1043, December.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. David Howden & Yang Zhou, 2014. "China's One-Child Policy: Some Unintended Consequences," Economic Affairs, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 34(3), pages 353-369, October.
    2. de Wit, Marc & Londo, Marc & Faaij, André, 2011. "Productivity developments in European agriculture: Relations to and opportunities for biomass production," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 15(5), pages 2397-2412, June.
    3. Howden, David & Zhou, Yang, 2014. "Unintended Consequences of China´s One-Child Policy," MPRA Paper 79607, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ags:iaae06:25353. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (AgEcon Search). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/iaaeeea.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.