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CO2 emissions, energy consumption and economic growth in Tunisia


  • Chebbi, Houssem Eddine
  • Boujelbene, Y.


The aim of this country specific study is to understand long and short-run linkages between economic growth, energy consumption and CO2 emission using Tunisian data over the period 1971-2004. Statistical findings indicate that economic growth, energy consumption and CO2 emission are related in the long-run and provide some evidence of inefficient use of energy in Tunisia, since environmental pressure tends to rise faster than economic growth. In the short run, results support the argument that economic growth exerts a positive “causal” influence on energy consumption growth. In addition, results from impulse response do not confirm the hypothesis that an increase in pollution level induces economic expansion. Although Tunisia has no commitment to reduce Greenhouse Gas emissions, energy efficiency investments and emission reduction policies will not hurt economic activities and can be a feasible policy tool for Tunisia.

Suggested Citation

  • Chebbi, Houssem Eddine & Boujelbene, Y., 2008. "CO2 emissions, energy consumption and economic growth in Tunisia," 2008 International Congress, August 26-29, 2008, Ghent, Belgium 44016, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:eaae08:44016

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    6. Asafu-Adjaye, John, 2000. "The relationship between energy consumption, energy prices and economic growth: time series evidence from Asian developing countries," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(6), pages 615-625, December.
    7. Hettige, Hemamala & Lucas, Robert E B & Wheeler, David, 1992. "The Toxic Intensity of Industrial Production: Global Patterns, Trends, and Trade Policy," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(2), pages 478-481, May.
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    1. repec:eee:enepol:v:110:y:2017:i:c:p:600-608 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Mohd Shahidan Shaari & Nor Ermawati Hussain & Hussin Abdullah & Syahida Kamil, 2014. "Relationship among Foreign Direct Investment, Economic Growth and CO2 Emission: A Panel Data Analysis," International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy, Econjournals, vol. 4(4), pages 706-715.
    3. Chibueze, E. Nnaji & Jude, O. Chukwu & Nnaji Moses, 2013. "Electricity Supply, Fossil fuel Consumption, Co2 Emissions and Economic Growth: Implications and Policy Options for Sustainable Development in Nigeria," International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy, Econjournals, vol. 3(3), pages 262-271.
    4. Erdyas Bimanatya, Traheka & Widodo, Tri, 2017. "Energy Conservation, Fossil Fuel Consumption, CO2 Emission and Economic Growth in Indonesia," MPRA Paper 79989, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Fakhri, Issaoui & Hassen, Toumi & Wassim, Touili, 2015. "Effects Of CO2 Emissions On Economic Growth, Urbanization And Welfare: Application To Mena Countries," MPRA Paper 65683, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Hatem M'henni & Mohamed El Hedi Arouri & Adel Ben Youssef & Christophe Rault, 2011. "Income Level and Environmental Quality in The MENA Countries: Discussing the Environmental Kuznets Curve Hypothesis," Working Papers 587, Economic Research Forum, revised 05 Jan 2011.
    7. Nasreen, Samia & Anwar, Sofia, 2014. "Causal relationship between trade openness, economic growth and energy consumption: A panel data analysis of Asian countries," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 69(C), pages 82-91.

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    CO2 emissions; Energy Consumption; Economic Growth; Tunisia; Resource /Energy Economics and Policy;

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