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Why is Inequality Back on the Agenda?

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  • Kanbur, Ravi
  • Lustig, Nora

Abstract

This paper investigates the reasons why inequality, and distribution more generally, have come to the fore in the development discourse at the tum of the century, after a period of relative neglect in the 1980s. The paper considers, in particular the analysis of (a) efficiency and equity, (b) growth and distribution, (c) recent changes in inequality, (d) recent work on the complex patterns of inequality change in developing countries, and (e) inequality between countries. All of these different strands of analyses have ensured that inequality will be prominent on the development agenda in the decade to come.

Suggested Citation

  • Kanbur, Ravi & Lustig, Nora, 1999. "Why is Inequality Back on the Agenda?," Working Papers 127690, Cornell University, Department of Applied Economics and Management.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:cudawp:127690
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    File URL: http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/127690/files/Cornell_Dyson_wp9914.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Keywords

    Food Security and Poverty;

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