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Valuation of Water Quality Improvements in the Karapiro Catchment: A Choice Modelling Approach

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  • Marsh, Dan
  • Baskaran, Ramesh

Abstract

Water pollution is widely considered to be one of the most important environmental issues facing New Zealand. Waikato region residents have reported that water pollution is easily their most important environmental concern in each of four attitude surveys conducted by Environment Waikato. Technical and regulatory mechanisms to reduce water pollution, especially non-point source pollution from agriculture are the focus of an intensive research effort both in New Zealand and internationally. This work should assist farmers and policy makers to identify the most cost effective options for achieving any given improvement in water quality. Research described in this paper aims to complement existing research projects by developing appropriate methodology for valuation of water quality improvements in New Zealand. It is envisaged that this type of information will inform the policy process by allowing decision makers to consider both the costs and the benefits of different levels of water quality improvements. This paper describes the first phase focussed on the Karapiro catchment which used focus groups and choice modelling in order to understand and quantify the value of water quality improvements in the catchment.

Suggested Citation

  • Marsh, Dan & Baskaran, Ramesh, 2009. "Valuation of Water Quality Improvements in the Karapiro Catchment: A Choice Modelling Approach," 2009 Conference (53rd), February 11-13, 2009, Cairns, Australia 47951, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aare09:47951
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/47951
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    3. Brownstone, David & Train, Kenneth, 1998. "Forecasting new product penetration with flexible substitution patterns," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 89(1-2), pages 109-129, November.
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    6. David Revelt & Kenneth Train, 1998. "Mixed Logit With Repeated Choices: Households' Choices Of Appliance Efficiency Level," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 80(4), pages 647-657, November.
    7. Hanley, Nick & Mourato, Susana & Wright, Robert E, 2001. " Choice Modelling Approaches: A Superior Alternative for Environmental Valuation?," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 15(3), pages 435-462, July.
    8. Riccardo Scarpa & Danny Campbell & W. George Hutchinson, 2007. "Benefit Estimates for Landscape Improvements: Sequential Bayesian Design and Respondents’ Rationality in a Choice Experiment," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 83(4), pages 617-634.
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    Cited by:

    1. Marsh, Dan & Mkwara, Lena Asimenye & Scarpa, Riccardo, 2010. "Does respondent’s perceived knowledge of the status quo affect attribute attendance and WTP in choice experiments? Evidence from the Karapiro Catchment Freshwater streams," 2010 Conference, August 26-27, 2010, Nelson, New Zealand 96809, New Zealand Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.
    2. Zhang, Fan & Fogarty, James, 2015. "Nonmarket Valuation of Water Sensitive Cities: Current Knowledge and Issues," Working Papers 207694, University of Western Australia, School of Agricultural and Resource Economics.

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    Keywords

    Water Quality; Non Market Valuation; Choice Modelling;

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