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Ex-post Livestock Diseases, and Pastoralists' Averting Decisions in Tanzania


  • Ahamad, Mazbahul
  • Gustafson, Christopher
  • VanWormer, Elizabeth


Little is known about the factors affecting pastoralists’ livestock vaccination decisions. In this paper, we use a novel survey-based dataset on pastoralists living in the Ruaha landscape in Tanzania, and employ several econometric approaches to identify the factors affecting pastoralists’ decision-making process about vaccination when disease occurrence and severity, vaccination and healthcare access costs and other related variables are known. Results from binary choice models that account for excess zeros indicate that socially and economically active households are more likely to vaccinate their livestock. The results also identify positive marginal effects of having wage earners and illness incidence on vaccination decisions. The results from mixture models also find that these same variables significantly lower the pastoralist’s probability to vaccinate no livestock. Most notably, vaccination cost significantly lowers the probability that pastoralists vaccinate any livestock, as well as the number of vaccinated livestock. These findings have important policy implications considering livestock health education, veterinary service infrastructure, and supply-side management.

Suggested Citation

  • Ahamad, Mazbahul & Gustafson, Christopher & VanWormer, Elizabeth, 2016. "Ex-post Livestock Diseases, and Pastoralists' Averting Decisions in Tanzania," 2016 Annual Meeting, July 31-August 2, 2016, Boston, Massachusetts 235764, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea16:235764

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Christophe Bontemps & Céline Nauges, 2016. "The Impact of Perceptions in Averting-decision Models: An Application of the Special Regressor Method to Drinking Water Choices," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 98(1), pages 297-313.
    2. Wolf, Christopher A., 2005. "Producer Livestock Disease Management Incentives and Decisions," International Food and Agribusiness Management Review, International Food and Agribusiness Management Association (IFAMA), vol. 8(01).
    3. Hausman, Jerry, 2015. "Specification tests in econometrics," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 38(2), pages 112-134.
    4. Rault, Arnaud & Krebs, Stephane, 2014. "Farmers’ willingness to vaccinate against endemic animal diseases: A theoretical approach," 2014 International Congress, August 26-29, 2014, Ljubljana, Slovenia 182780, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
    5. Vuong, Quang H, 1989. "Likelihood Ratio Tests for Model Selection and Non-nested Hypotheses," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 57(2), pages 307-333, March.
    6. Travis J. Lybbert & Christopher B. Barrett & Solomon Desta & D. Layne Coppock, 2004. "Stochastic wealth dynamics and risk management among a poor population," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 114(498), pages 750-777, October.
    7. Mikkel Barslund, 2007. "CHECKROB: Stata module to perform robustness check of alternative specifications," Statistical Software Components S456837, Boston College Department of Economics.
    8. John Mclnerney, 1996. "Old Economics For New Problems -Livestock Disease: Presidential Address," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 47(1-4), pages 295-314.
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    More about this item


    Africa; Averting action; Averting expenditure; Hurdle model; Zero inflated model; Vaccination decision; Community/Rural/Urban Development; Consumer/Household Economics; Health Economics and Policy; Livestock Production/Industries; D13; D83; Q12; Q13; R28;

    JEL classification:

    • D13 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Production and Intrahouse Allocation
    • D83 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Search; Learning; Information and Knowledge; Communication; Belief; Unawareness
    • Q12 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Micro Analysis of Farm Firms, Farm Households, and Farm Input Markets
    • Q13 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Agricultural Markets and Marketing; Cooperatives; Agribusiness
    • R28 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Government Policy

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