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Factors Affecting Direct and Indirect Energy Use in U.S. Corn Production

Author

Listed:
  • Musser, Wesley N.
  • Lambert, Dayton M.
  • Daberkow, Stan G.

Abstract

The recent volatility of energy prices has numerous policy implications for agriculture. A better understanding of the factors associated with energy consumption as related to crop production management decisions and technology use may provide insight about how producers might respond to program or market incentives targeting energy use in particular, and soil and water conservation in general. Adoption of minimum tillage could reduce erosion and improved fertilizer management practices could reduce nitrogen runoff. Energy costs may be reduced with adoption of reduced tillage technology, improved drying and irrigation systems, or more careful attention to the application and timing of fertilizers.

Suggested Citation

  • Musser, Wesley N. & Lambert, Dayton M. & Daberkow, Stan G., 2006. "Factors Affecting Direct and Indirect Energy Use in U.S. Corn Production," 2006 Annual meeting, July 23-26, Long Beach, CA 21063, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea06:21063
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/21063
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Fernandez-Cornejo, Jorge & Hendricks, Chad & Mishra, Ashok K., 2005. "Technology Adoption and Off-Farm Household Income: The Case of Herbicide-Tolerant Soybeans," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Southern Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 37(03), December.
    2. Gowdy, John M. & Miller, Jack L. & Kherbachi, Hamid, 1987. "Energy Use In U.S. Agriculture: Early Adjustment To The 1973-74 Price Shock," Southern Journal of Agricultural Economics, Southern Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 19(02), December.
    3. Havlicek, Joseph & Capps, Oral, 1977. "Needed Research with Respect to Energy Use in Agricultural Production," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 9(01), pages 1-8, July.
    4. Raulston, J. Marc & Knapek, George M. & Outlaw, Joe L. & Richardson, James W. & Klose, Steven L. & Anderson, David P., 2005. "The Impact of Rising Energy Prices on Income for Representative Farms in the Western United States," Western Economics Forum, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 4(02).
    5. Madhu Khanna, 2001. "Sequential Adoption of Site-Specific Technologies and its Implications for Nitrogen Productivity: A Double Selectivity Model," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 83(1), pages 35-51.
    6. Ani L. Katchova, 2005. "The Farm Diversification Discount," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 87(4), pages 984-994.
    7. Adelaja, Adesoji O. & Hoque, Anwarul, 1986. "A Multi-Product Analysis Of Energy Demand In Agricultural Subsectors," Southern Journal of Agricultural Economics, Southern Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 18(02), December.
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    11. Hisham El-Osta & Ashok Mishra & Mary Ahearn, 2004. "Labor Supply by Farm Operators Under “Decoupled” Farm Program Payments," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 2(4), pages 367-385, August.
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    Cited by:

    1. Esmaeili, Abdoulkarim & Shokoohi, Zainab, 2011. "Assessing the effect of oil price on world food prices: Application of principal component analysis," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(2), pages 1022-1025, February.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    energy; fuel; nitrogen; farm management; technology; Crop Production/Industries; Q12; Q40;

    JEL classification:

    • Q12 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Micro Analysis of Farm Firms, Farm Households, and Farm Input Markets
    • Q40 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - General

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