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A Trait Specific Model of GM Crop Adoption among U.S. Corn Farmers in the Upper Midwest

Author

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  • Useche, Pilar
  • Barham, Bradford L.
  • Foltz, Jeremy D.

Abstract

This work offers a new approach to the adoption of GM crop varieties by adopting the econometric methodology of the characteristics-based demand literature. A random utility framework was implemented through different specifications of a conditional (CL) and a mixed multinomial logit (MMNL) model of crop-variety choice. Willingness-to-pay and price elasticity estimates for traits were calculated. The MMNL approach demonstrates that individuals' tastes for some traits significantly vary across the population. Results further suggest that labor saving technologies have a much wider potential to be adopted. Overall, the use of a trait-based model to examine the adoption patterns of GM crop varieties among corn farmers in Minnesota and Wisconsin reveals a new set of results and lessons that classic adoption models cannot provide.

Suggested Citation

  • Useche, Pilar & Barham, Bradford L. & Foltz, Jeremy D., 2005. "A Trait Specific Model of GM Crop Adoption among U.S. Corn Farmers in the Upper Midwest," 2005 Annual meeting, July 24-27, Providence, RI 19202, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea05:19202
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    File URL: http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/19202/files/sp05us01.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Jennifer Schweiger & Ali Ferjani, 2009. "Determinanten einer potenziellen Anbaubereitschaft von transgenen Kulturen: Untersuchungsregion im Kanton Z├╝rich," Journal of Socio-Economics in Agriculture (Until 2015: Yearbook of Socioeconomics in Agriculture), Swiss Society for Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology, vol. 2(1), pages 59-80.

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