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Adoption of a Politicized Technology: bST and Wisconsin Dairy Farmers

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  • Bradford L. Barham

Abstract

Technologies that are the focus of extensive public debate prior to commercialization may have diffusion paths which are distinct from the classic sigmoid shape often used by economists. Descriptive and econometric analysis of ex ante and ex post data on bovine somatotropin use by Wisconsin dairy farmers reveal that this controversial technology has a relatively low adoption rate and little prospect for adoption growth in the near future. Further research on potential adoption outcomes for technologies that are politicized prior to commercialization could improve economists' predictive capacities. Copyright 1996, Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Bradford L. Barham, 1996. "Adoption of a Politicized Technology: bST and Wisconsin Dairy Farmers," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 78(4), pages 1056-1063.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:ajagec:v:78:y:1996:i:4:p:1056-1063
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.2307/1243861
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Mooney, Daniel F. & Barham, Bradford L. & Lian, Chang, 2013. "Sustainable Biofuels, Marginal Agricultural Lands, and Farm Supply Response: Micro-Evidence for Southwest Wisconsin," 2013 Annual Meeting, August 4-6, 2013, Washington, D.C. 150510, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    2. Tauer, Loren W., 2003. "The Impact of recombinant bovine Somatotropin on Dairy Farm Profits: A Switching Regression Analysis," Working Papers 127241, Cornell University, Department of Applied Economics and Management.
    3. Alexander, Corinne E. & Fernandez-Cornejo, Jorge & Goodhue, Rachael E., 2003. "Farmers Adoption of Genetically Modified Varieties with Input Traits," Research Reports 11928, University of California, Davis, Giannini Foundation.
    4. Jeremy D. Foltz & Hsiu-Hui Chang, 2002. "The Adoption and Profitability of rbST on Connecticut Dairy Farms," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 84(4), pages 1021-1032.
    5. W. Lesser & John Bernard & Kaafee Billah, 1999. "Methodologies for ex ante projections of adoption rates for agbiotech products: Lessons learned from rBST," Agribusiness, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 15(2), pages 149-162.
    6. Barham, Bradford L. & Foltz, Jeremy D. & Moon, Sunung & Jackson-Smith, Douglas, 2002. "Rbst Use Among U.S. Dairy Farmers: A Comparative Analysis From 6 States," 2002 Annual meeting, July 28-31, Long Beach, CA 19598, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    7. Meredith T. Niles & Margaret Brown & Robyn Dynes, 2016. "Farmer’s intended and actual adoption of climate change mitigation and adaptation strategies," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 135(2), pages 277-295, March.
    8. An, Henry, 2012. "Complementarities in Production Technologies: An Empirical Analysis of the Dairy Industry," 2012 Annual Meeting, August 12-14, 2012, Seattle, Washington 124653, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    9. repec:oup:revage:v:26:y:2004:i:1:p:32-44. is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Bradford L. Barham & Jeremy D. Foltz & Sunung Moon & Douglas Jackson-Smith, 2004. "A Comparative Analysis of Recombinant Bovine Somatotropin Adoption across Major U.S. Dairy Regions," Review of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 26(1), pages 32-44.
    11. Butler, Leslie J. & Henriques, Irene, 2001. "Adoption and Diffusion of Biotechnology: rbST in California," 2001 Conference (45th), January 23-25, 2001, Adelaide 125548, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.
    12. repec:oup:revage:v:26:y:2004:i:4:p:472-488. is not listed on IDEAS
    13. Alexander, Corinne E. & Fernandez-Cornejo, Jorge & Goodhue, Rachael E., 2003. "Effects of the GM Controversy on Iowa Corn-Soybean Farmers' Acreage Allocation Decisions," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 28(03), December.
    14. Kazumi Kondoh & Raymond Jussaume, 2006. "Contextualizing farmers’ attitudes towards genetically modified crops," Agriculture and Human Values, Springer;The Agriculture, Food, & Human Values Society (AFHVS), vol. 23(3), pages 341-352, October.
    15. Useche, Pilar & Barham, Bradford & Foltz, Jeremy, 2006. "A Trait Specific Model of GM Crop Adoption by Minnesota and Wisconsin Corn Farmers," Working Papers 201525, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Food System Research Group.
    16. Useche, Pilar & Barham, Bradford L. & Foltz, Jeremy D., 2005. "A Trait Specific Model of GM Crop Adoption among U.S. Corn Farmers in the Upper Midwest," 2005 Annual meeting, July 24-27, Providence, RI 19202, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    17. Mooney, Daniel F. & Barham, Bradford L., 2013. "What Drives the Adoption of Clean Agricultural Technologies? An Ex Ante Assessment of Sustainable Biofuel Production in Southwestern Wisconsin," 2013 Annual Meeting, August 4-6, 2013, Washington, D.C. 150557, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    18. Barham, Bradford L. & Jackson-Smith, Douglas & Moon, Sunung, 2002. "The Dynamics Of Agricultural Biotechnology Adoption: Lessons From Rbst Use In Wisconsin, 1994-2001," 2002 Annual meeting, July 28-31, Long Beach, CA 19627, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    19. William D. McBride & Sara Short & Hisham El-Osta, 2004. "The Adoption and Impact of Bovine Somatotropin on U.S. Dairy Farms," Review of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 26(4), pages 472-488.
    20. McBride, William D. & Short, Sara D. & El-Osta, Hisham S., 2002. "Production And Financial Impacts Of The Adoption Of Bovine Somatotropin On U.S. Dairy Farms," 2002 Annual meeting, July 28-31, Long Beach, CA 19908, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).

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