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Credit Counseling And Mortgage Loan Default By Rural And Urban Low Income Households

  • Hartarska, Valentina M.
  • Gonzalez-Vega, Claudio
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    A competing risks model is implemented to establish the influence of cash flow-based counseling on mortgage loan repayment by rural and urban low-income households. Data from 405 counseled and non-counseled clients are used to test hypotheses about the effectiveness of counseling, duration of effects, and rural-urban differences.

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    Paper provided by American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association) in its series 2001 Annual meeting, August 5-8, Chicago, IL with number 20740.

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    Date of creation: 2001
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea01:20740
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    1. John M. Quigley., 1993. "Explicit Tests of Contingent Claims Models of Mortgage Defaults," Economics Working Papers 93-221, University of California at Berkeley.
    2. Yongheng Deng & John M. Quigley & Robert Van Order, . "Mortgage Terminations, Heterogeneity and the Exercise of Mortgage Options," Zell/Lurie Center Working Papers 322, Wharton School Samuel Zell and Robert Lurie Real Estate Center, University of Pennsylvania.
    3. Dennis R. Capozza & Dick Kazarian & Thomas A. Thomson, 1998. "The Conditional Probability of Mortgage Default," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 26(3), pages 259-289.
    4. Yongheng Deng, . "Mortgage Termination: An Empirical Hazard Model with Stochastic Term Structure," Working Papers _002, University of California at Berkeley, Econometrics Laboratory Software Archive.
    5. Robert Order & Peter Zorn, 2000. "Income, Location and Default: Some Implications for Community Lending," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 28(3), pages 385-404.
    6. Quigley, John M. & Van Order, Robert, 1991. "Defaults on mortgage obligations and capital requirements for U.S. savings institutions : A policy perspective," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(3), pages 353-369, April.
    7. Quigley, John M., 2006. "Urban Economics," Berkeley Program on Housing and Urban Policy, Working Paper Series qt0jr0p2tk, Berkeley Program on Housing and Urban Policy.
    8. Deng, Yongheng & Quigley, John M. & Van Order, Robert & Mac, Freddie, 1996. "Mortgage default and low downpayment loans: The costs of public subsidy," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 26(3-4), pages 263-285, June.
    9. Vassilis Lekkas & John M. Quigley & Robert Order, 1993. "Loan Loss Severity and Optimal Mortgage Default," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 21(4), pages 353-371.
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