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Money Demand Function: A heterogeneous Panel Application

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  • Nasri Harb

    (Department of Economics, College of Business and Economics, United Arab Emirates University)

Abstract

We construct an aggregate data panel for the GCC's six countries and verify the cointegration hypothesis among the variables of the money demand function using Pedroni's heterogeneous panel cointegration tests (2001). Then, we estimate the idiosyncratic, panel and group-mean cointegrating vectors using FMOLS and a modified version of FMOLS developed by Pedroni (2000). We find strong evidence of cointegration amongst our variables. The estimated elasticities have the expected signs in general but are significant only in the case of the scale variable. Unlike previous studies, we find a significant negative the semi elasticity of money demand with respect to interest rate when we allow for heterogeneity amongst our panel's members.

Suggested Citation

  • Nasri Harb, 2003. "Money Demand Function: A heterogeneous Panel Application," Economics Working Papers 03/04-01, Department of Economics, College of Business and Economics, UAE University.
  • Handle: RePEc:aeu:econom:03/04-01
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Peter C.B. Phillips, 1992. "Hyper-Consistent Estimation of a Unit Root in Time Series Regression," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 1040, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University.
    2. Quah, Danny, 1994. "Exploiting cross-section variation for unit root inference in dynamic data," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 44(1-2), pages 9-19.
    3. Peter Pedroni, 1999. "Critical Values for Cointegration Tests in Heterogeneous Panels with Multiple Regressors," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 61(S1), pages 653-670, November.
    4. Perron, Pierre, 1991. "Test Consistency with Varying Sampling Frequency," Econometric Theory, Cambridge University Press, vol. 7(3), pages 341-368, September.
    5. Darrat, Ali F. & Al-Mutawa, Ahmed, 1996. "Modelling money demand in the United Arab Emirates," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 36(1), pages 65-87.
    6. Pedroni, Peter, 1999. "Critical Values for Cointegration Tests in Heterogeneous Panels with Multiple Regressors," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 61(0), pages 653-670, Special I.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Demand; Time series; Panel Cointegration; FMOLS;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C22 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes
    • C23 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • E41 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Demand for Money
    • F41 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Open Economy Macroeconomics

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