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On the long-run determinants of real exchange rates for developing countries : Evidence from Africa, Latin America and Asia

Author

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  • Christophe Rault
  • Imed Drine

Abstract

The main goal of this paper is to tackle the empirical issues of the real exchange rate litterature by applying recently developed panel cointegration techniques to a structural long-run real exchange rate equation. We consider here a sample of 45 developing countries, divided into three groups according to geographical criteria: Africa, Latin America and Asia. Our investigations confirm that having a reference to assess the degree of distortion of real exchange rate is not as simple as it can be thought with the PPP concept. The real exchange rate is effectively at the centre of an economic spiral and its value depends on the economic specificities of each country. In other words, we don't have a fixed and general norm but, for each economy, the real exchange rate trajectory depends on its development level, on the way economic policy is conducted, and on its position on the international market

Suggested Citation

  • Christophe Rault & Imed Drine, 2004. "On the long-run determinants of real exchange rates for developing countries : Evidence from Africa, Latin America and Asia," Econometric Society 2004 Far Eastern Meetings 403, Econometric Society.
  • Handle: RePEc:ecm:feam04:403
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Michel Aglietta & Camille Baulant & Virginie Coudert, 1997. "Why the Euro will be Strong: an Approach Based on Equilibrium Exchange Rates," Working Papers 1997-18, CEPII research center.
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    3. Janine Aron & Ibrahim Elbadawi & Brian Kahn, 1998. "Determinants of the real exchange rate in South Africa," CSAE Working Paper Series 1997-16, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
    4. Elbadawi, Ibrahim A. & Soto, Raimundo, 1994. "Capital flows and long-term equilibrium real exchange rates in Chile," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1306, The World Bank.
    5. Cottani, Joaquin A & Cavallo, Domingo F & Khan, M Shahbaz, 1990. "Real Exchange Rate Behavior and Economic Performance in LDCs," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 39(1), pages 61-76, October.
    6. Edwards, Sebastian, 1988. "Real and monetary determinants of real exchange rate behavior: Theory and evidence from developing countries," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(3), pages 311-341, November.
    7. Im, Kyung So & Pesaran, M. Hashem & Shin, Yongcheol, 2003. "Testing for unit roots in heterogeneous panels," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 115(1), pages 53-74, July.
    8. John Williamson, 1994. "Estimating Equilibrium Exchange Rates," Peterson Institute Press: All Books, Peterson Institute for International Economics, number 17.
    9. Ronald MacDonald, 1997. "What Determines Real Exchange Rates? The Long and Short of it," IMF Working Papers 97/21, International Monetary Fund.
    10. Ghura, Dhaneshwar & Grennes, Thomas J., 1993. "The real exchange rate and macroeconomic performance in Sub-Saharan Africa," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(1), pages 155-174, October.
    11. Imed Drine & Christophe Rault, 2003. "Do panel data permit the rescue of the Balassa-Samuelson hypothesis for Latin American countries?," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 35(3), pages 351-359.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Jesús Ferreyra & Jorge Salas, 2006. "The Equilibrium Real Exchange Rate in Peru: BEER Models and Confidence Band Building," Working Papers 2006-006, Banco Central de Reserva del Perú.
    2. Jorge Carrera & Romain Restout, 2008. "Long Run Determinants of Real Exchange Rates in Latin America," Post-Print halshs-00276402, HAL.
    3. Mohamed El Hedi Arouri & Adel Ben Youssef & Hatem M'Henni & Christophe Rault, 2014. "Energy use and economic growth in Africa: a panel Granger-causality investigation," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 34(2), pages 1247-1258.
    4. Hernán Herrera-Echeverri & Jerry Haar & Alexander Arrieta Jiménez & Manuel Araújo Zapata, 2015. "Devaluation, Competitiveness And New Business Formation In Emerging Countries," Journal of Developmental Entrepreneurship (JDE), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 20(03), pages 1-22, September.
    5. Ibrahim A. Elbadawi & Linda Kaltani, 2014. "Real Exchange Rates and Export Performance in Oil-Dependent Arab Economies," Working Papers 878, Economic Research Forum, revised Nov 2014.
    6. Elbadawi, Ibrahim A. & Kaltani, Linda & Schmidt-Hebbel, Klaus, 2007. "Post-conflict aid, real exchange rate adjustment, and catch-up growth," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4187, The World Bank.
    7. César Calderón M., 2004. "Un Análisis del Comportamiento del Tipo de Cambio Real en Chile," Journal Economía Chilena (The Chilean Economy), Central Bank of Chile, vol. 7(1), pages 5-30, April.
    8. Guglielmo Maria Caporale & Thouraya Hadj Amor & Christophe Rault, 2011. "International financial integration and real exchange rate long-run dynamics in emerging countries: Some panel evidence," The Journal of International Trade & Economic Development, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 20(6), pages 789-808, September.
    9. Elbadawi, Ibrahim A. & Kaltani, Linda & Soto, Raimundo, 2012. "Aid, Real Exchange Rate Misalignment, and Economic Growth in Sub-Saharan Africa," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(4), pages 681-700.
    10. Genius, Margarita & Tzouvelekas, Vangelis, 2008. "The Balassa-Samuelson Productivity Bias Hypothesis: Further Evidence Using Panel Data," Agricultural Economics Review, Greek Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 9(2), June.
    11. Guglielmo Maria Caporale & Thouraya Hadj Amor & Christophe Rault, 2011. "Sources of Real Exchange Rate Volatility and International Financial Integration: A Dynamic GMM Panel Approach," CESifo Working Paper Series 3645, CESifo Group Munich.
    12. Colque H., Paul, 2006. "Fundamentos del Tipo de Cambio Real de Equilibrio," Documentos de trabajo 4/2006, Instituto de Investigaciones Socio-Económicas (IISEC), Universidad Católica Boliviana.
    13. Mahmood-ur- Rahman & Sujan Kumar Ghosh, 2013. "Productivity Bias Hypothesis: The Case of South Asia," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 33(3), pages 1771-1779.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Real exchange rate; Developing country; Panel data methods;

    JEL classification:

    • E31 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Price Level; Inflation; Deflation
    • F0 - International Economics - - General
    • F31 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Foreign Exchange

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