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Motives for Participation in On-Line Open Innovation Platforms

  • Tuba Bakici
  • Esteve Almirall
  • Jonathan Wareham
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    The increasing need to compete on innovation, together with the prevalence of IT in our social and economic interactions has led to a globalization in the sourcing of innovation. One of the best examples of this process is the raise of on-line Open Innovation Intermediaries as both markets for innovation and a locus where innovative solutions are devised. Therefore, understanding what are the main motivations that drive the participation of people into these intermediaries is increasingly relevant for organizations that seek to tap into the massive information potential. This is why this paper aims to develop an understanding on this matter with a modified version of Theory of planned behavior (TPB).

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    Paper provided by DRUID, Copenhagen Business School, Department of Industrial Economics and Strategy/Aalborg University, Department of Business Studies in its series DRUID Working Papers with number 11-14.

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    Date of creation: 2011
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:aal:abbswp:11-14
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    1. Bitzer, Jurgen & Schrettl, Wolfram & Schroder, Philipp J.H., 2007. "Intrinsic motivation in open source software development," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 35(1), pages 160-169, March.
    2. Howells, Jeremy, 2006. "Intermediation and the role of intermediaries in innovation," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(5), pages 715-728, June.
    3. Georg von Krogh & Eric von Hippel, 2006. "The Promise of Research on Open Source Software," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 52(7), pages 975-983, July.
    4. Dan Ariely & Uri Gneezy & George Loewenstein & Nina Mazar, 2005. "Large stakes and big mistakes," Working Papers 05-11, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
    5. Sheppard, Blair H & Hartwick, Jon & Warshaw, Paul R, 1988. " The Theory of Reasoned Action: A Meta-analysis of Past Research with Recommendations for Modifications and Future Research," Journal of Consumer Research, University of Chicago Press, vol. 15(3), pages 325-43, December.
    6. Holmstrom, Bengt, 1999. "Managerial Incentive Problems: A Dynamic Perspective," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 66(1), pages 169-82, January.
    7. Lindenberg, Siegwart, 2001. "Intrinsic Motivation in a New Light," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 54(2-3), pages 317-42.
    8. Hertel, Guido & Niedner, Sven & Herrmann, Stefanie, 2003. "Motivation of software developers in Open Source projects: an Internet-based survey of contributors to the Linux kernel," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 32(7), pages 1159-1177, July.
    9. Zeitlyn, David, 2003. "Gift economies in the development of open source software: anthropological reflections," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 32(7), pages 1287-1291, July.
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