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Why Technological Spillovers elude Developing Countries A Dynamic Non-linear Model

  • Watu Wamae
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    This paper attempts to theoretically understand the process of catching-up or falling behind particularly within the context of developing countries. The main aim of the paper consists in investigating the impact of domestic innovation, via its interaction with the learning capability, on the technology gap of an economy. More specifically, we seek to shed some light on why the tendency for poor countries to fall further behind, despite efforts to improve their learning capabilities, appears pervasive. Our analysis is based on a simple model of technology gap elaborated by Verspagen (1991). We find that domestic innovation, a critical component for the development of an absorptive capacity, is a significant determinant of whether an economy catches-up or falls further behind.

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    Paper provided by DRUID, Copenhagen Business School, Department of Industrial Economics and Strategy/Aalborg University, Department of Business Studies in its series DRUID Working Papers with number 06-02.

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    Date of creation: 2006
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:aal:abbswp:06-02
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    1. Romer, Paul M, 1990. "Endogenous Technological Change," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 98(5), pages S71-102, October.
    2. Jan Fagerberg & Martin Srholec & Bart Verspagen, 2009. "Innovation and Economic Development," Working Papers on Innovation Studies 20090723, Centre for Technology, Innovation and Culture, University of Oslo, revised Oct 2009.
    3. Nelson, Richard R & Pack, Howard, 1999. "The Asian Miracle and Modern Growth Theory," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 109(457), pages 416-36, July.
    4. Fagerberg, Jan, 1987. "A technology gap approach to why growth rates differ," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 16(2-4), pages 87-99, August.
    5. Klenow, Peter J. & Rodriguez-Clare, Andres, 2005. "Externalities and Growth," Handbook of Economic Growth, in: Philippe Aghion & Steven Durlauf (ed.), Handbook of Economic Growth, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 11, pages 817-861 Elsevier.
    6. Devarajan, Shantayanan & Easterley, William R. & Pack, Howard, 2001. "Is investment in Africa too low or too high : macro and micro evidence," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2519, The World Bank.
    7. Lucas, Robert Jr., 1988. "On the mechanics of economic development," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 3-42, July.
    8. Frank Lichtenberg & Bruno van Pottelsberghe de la Potterie, 1996. "International R&D Spillovers: A Re-Examination," NBER Working Papers 5668, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Abramovitz, Moses, 1986. "Catching Up, Forging Ahead, and Falling Behind," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 46(02), pages 385-406, June.
    10. Baumol, William J & Wolff, Edward N, 1988. "Productivity Growth, Convergence, and Welfare: Reply," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 78(5), pages 1155-59, December.
    11. Jones, Charles I, 1995. "R&D-Based Models of Economic Growth," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 103(4), pages 759-84, August.
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