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Black Economic Progress after 1964: Who Has Gained and Why?

In: Studies in Labor Markets

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  • Richard B. Freeman

Abstract

This study used three types of evidence to analyze the nature and cause of black economic progress in post-World War II years: aggregate evidence on the timing and incidence among skill groups of changes in the relative earnings or occupational position of blacks; cross-sectional evidence on the family background determinants of the socioeconomic achievement of blacks; and information from company personnel offices regarding personnel policies toward black (and other) workers affected by civil rights legislation.
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Suggested Citation

  • Richard B. Freeman, 1981. "Black Economic Progress after 1964: Who Has Gained and Why?," NBER Chapters,in: Studies in Labor Markets, pages 247-294 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberch:8913
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Giora Hanoch, 1967. "An Economic Analysis of Earnings and Schooling," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 2(3), pages 310-329.
    2. Richard Butler & James J. Heckman, 1977. "The Government's Impact on the Labor Market Status of Black Americans: A Critical Review," NBER Working Papers 0183, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Robert E. Hall & Richard A. Kasten, 1973. "The Relative Occupational Success of Blacks and Whites," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, pages 781-798.
    4. Reynolds Farley & Albert Hermalin, 1972. "The 1960s: A decade of progress for blacks?," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 9(3), pages 353-370, August.
    5. Weiss, Leonard W & Williamson, Jeffrey G, 1972. "Black Education, Earnings, and Interregional Migration: Some New Evidence," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, pages 372-383.
    6. James J. Heckman & Kenneth I. Wolpin, 1976. "Does the Contract Compliance Program Work? An Analysis of Chicago Data," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, pages 544-564.
    7. Morris Goldstein & Robert S. Smith, 1976. "The Estimated Impact of the Antidiscrimination Program Aimed at Federal Contractors," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, pages 523-543.
    8. Welch, Finis, 1973. "Black-White Differences in Returns to Schooling," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, pages 893-907.
    9. Weiss, Randall D, 1970. "The Effect of Education on the Earnings of Blacks and Whites," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, pages 150-159.
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    1. repec:eee:labchp:v:1:y:1986:i:c:p:693-785 is not listed on IDEAS

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