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Black Economic Progress after 1964: Who Has Gained and Why?

In: Studies in Labor Markets

  • Richard B. Freeman

This study used three types of evidence to analyze the nature and cause of black economic progress in post-World War II years: aggregate evidence on the timing and incidence among skill groups of changes in the relative earnings or occupational position of blacks; cross-sectional evidence on the family background determinants of the socioeconomic achievement of blacks; and information from company personnel offices regarding personnel policies toward black (and other) workers affected by civil rights legislation.

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This chapter was published in:
  • Sherwin Rosen, 1981. "Studies in Labor Markets," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number rose81-1, March.
  • This item is provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Chapters with number 8913.
    Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberch:8913
    Contact details of provider: Postal:
    National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue Cambridge, MA 02138, U.S.A.

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    Web page: http://www.nber.org
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    1. Weiss, Leonard W & Williamson, Jeffrey G, 1972. "Black Education, Earnings, and Interregional Migration: Some New Evidence," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 62(3), pages 372-83, June.
    2. Giora Hanoch, 1967. "An Economic Analysis of Earnings and Schooling," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 2(3), pages 310-329.
    3. Robert E. Hall & Richard A. Kasten, 1973. "The Relative Occupational Success of Blacks and Whites," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 4(3), pages 781-798.
    4. James J. Heckman & Kenneth I. Wolpin, 1976. "Does the Contract Compliance Program Work? An Analysis of Chicago Data," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 29(4), pages 544-564, July.
    5. Welch, Finis, 1973. "Black-White Differences in Returns to Schooling," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 63(5), pages 893-907, December.
    6. Reynolds Farley & Albert Hermalin, 1972. "The 1960s: A decade of progress for blacks?," Demography, Springer, vol. 9(3), pages 353-370, August.
    7. Weiss, Randall D, 1970. "The Effect of Education on the Earnings of Blacks and Whites," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 52(2), pages 150-59, May.
    8. James J. Heckman & Kenneth I. Wolpin, 1976. "Does the contract compliance program work? An analysis of Chicago data," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 29(4), pages 544-564, July.
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