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Divergent Trends in Alternative Wage Series

In: Labor Statistics Measurement Issues


  • Katharine G. Abraham
  • James R. Spletzer
  • Jay C. Stewart


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Suggested Citation

  • Katharine G. Abraham & James R. Spletzer & Jay C. Stewart, 1998. "Divergent Trends in Alternative Wage Series," NBER Chapters,in: Labor Statistics Measurement Issues, pages 293-325 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberch:8363

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Mellow, Wesley & Sider, Hal, 1983. "Accuracy of Response in Labor Market Surveys: Evidence and Implications," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 1(4), pages 331-344, October.
    2. Levy, Frank & Murnane, Richard J, 1992. "U.S. Earnings Levels and Earnings Inequality: A Review of Recent Trends and Proposed Explanations," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 30(3), pages 1333-1381, September.
    3. Juhn, Chinhui & Murphy, Kevin M & Pierce, Brooks, 1993. "Wage Inequality and the Rise in Returns to Skill," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 101(3), pages 410-442, June.
    4. Bound, John & Johnson, George, 1992. "Changes in the Structure of Wages in the 1980's: An Evaluation of Alternative Explanations," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(3), pages 371-392, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Julien Champagne, 2014. "Reconciling the divergence in aggregate U.S. wage series," 2014 Meeting Papers 718, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    2. Joseph Altonji & Jennifer Oldham, 2003. "Vacation laws and annual work hours," Economic Perspectives, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, issue Q III, pages 19-29.
    3. Jordan Rappaport, 2008. "The affordability of homeownership to middle-income Americans," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, issue Q IV, pages 65-95.
    4. John T. Dunlop, 1998. "Real and Money Wage Rates," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 12(2), pages 223-234, Spring.
    5. John Bailey Jones & Fang Yang, 2016. "Skill-Biased Technical Change and the Cost of Higher Education," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 34(3), pages 621-662.
    6. Julien Champagne & André Kurmann, 2010. "The Great Increase in Relative Volatility of Real Wages in the United States," Cahiers de recherche 1010, CIRPEE.
    7. Kline, Patrick, 2008. "Understanding Sectoral Labor Market Dynamics: An Equilibrium Analysis of the Oil and Gas Field Services Industry," Working Papers 43, Yale University, Department of Economics.
    8. James R. Spletzer & Katharine G. Abraham & Jay C. Stewart, 1999. "Why Do Different Wage Series Tell Different Stories?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(2), pages 34-39, May.
    9. Katharine G. Abraham & James R. Spletzer & Michael J. Harper, 2010. "Introduction to "Labor in the New Economy"," NBER Chapters,in: Labor in the New Economy, pages 1-13 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Harley Frazis & Jay Stewart, 2010. "Why Do BLS Hours Series Tell Different Stories About Trends in Hours Worked?," NBER Chapters,in: Labor in the New Economy, pages 343-372 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    11. Peter Gottschalk & Michael Hansen, 1998. "Have Recent College Graduates Experienced Worsening Wage and Job Distributions?," Boston College Working Papers in Economics 412, Boston College Department of Economics.
    12. Champagne, Julien & Kurmann, André, 2013. "The great increase in relative wage volatility in the United States," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 60(2), pages 166-183.
    13. V. J. Hotz & J. K. Scholz, "undated". "Measuring Employment and Income for Low-Income Populations with Administrative and Survey Data," Institute for Research on Poverty Discussion Papers 1224-01, University of Wisconsin Institute for Research on Poverty.

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