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A Spatial Look at Housing Boom and Bust Cycles

In: Housing and the Financial Crisis

  • David Genesove
  • Lu Han

No abstract is available for this item.

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This chapter was published in:
  • Edward L. Glaeser & Todd Sinai, 2013. "Housing and the Financial Crisis," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number glae11-1, October.
  • This item is provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Chapters with number 12621.
    Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberch:12621
    Contact details of provider: Postal: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue Cambridge, MA 02138, U.S.A.
    Phone: 617-868-3900
    Web page: http://www.nber.orgEmail:


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    1. Veronica Guerrieri & Daniel Hartley & Erik Hurst, 2010. "Endogenous Gentrification and Housing Price Dynamics," NBER Working Papers 16237, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Marcy Burchfield & Henry G. Overman & Diego Puga & Matthew A. Turner, 2006. "Causes of Sprawl: A Portrait from Space," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 121(2), pages 587-633, May.
    3. Raven Molloy & Hui Shan, 2010. "The effect of gasoline prices on household location," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2010-36, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    4. Cotter, John & Gabriel, Stuart & Roll, Richard, 2011. "Integration and contagion in US housing markets," MPRA Paper 34591, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Mayer, Christopher J. & Somerville, C. Tsuriel, 2000. "Residential Construction: Using the Urban Growth Model to Estimate Housing Supply," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 48(1), pages 85-109, July.
    6. Capozza, Dennis R. & Helsley, Robert W., 1989. "The fundamentals of land prices and urban growth," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 26(3), pages 295-306, November.
    7. Stijn Van Nieuwerburgh & Pierre-Olivier Weill, 2006. "Why Has House Price Dispersion Gone Up?," NBER Working Papers 12538, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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