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Teaching and learning for economic life

In: Handbook of Research on Gender and Economic Life

Listed author(s):
  • Zohreh Emami
Registered author(s):

    The Handbook illuminates complex facets of the economic and social provisioning process across the globe. The contributors – academics, policy analysts and practitioners from wide-ranging areas of expertise – discuss the methodological approaches to, and analytical tools for, conducting research on the gender dimension of economic life. They also provide analyses of major issues facing both developed and developing countries. Topics explored include civil society, discrimination, informal work, working time, central bank policy, health, education, food security, poverty, migration, environmental activism and the financial crisis.

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    File URL: https://www.elgaronline.com/view/9780857930941.00015.xml
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    This chapter was published in:
  • Deborah M. Figart & Tonia L. Warnecke (ed.), 2013. "Handbook of Research on Gender and Economic Life," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 14323.
  • This item is provided by Edward Elgar Publishing in its series Chapters with number 14323_6.
    Handle: RePEc:elg:eechap:14323_6
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.e-elgar.com

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    References listed on IDEAS
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    1. Daniel Leclerc & Ed Ford & E. Ford, 2009. "A Constructivist Learning Approach to Income Inequality, Poverty and the “American Dream”," Forum for Social Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 38(2-3), pages 201-208, January.
    2. Valerie Adams & Julie Nelson, 2009. "The Economics of Nursing: Articulating Care," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 15(4), pages 3-29.
    3. April Laskey Aerni & Robin Bartlett & Margaret Lewis & Kim Marie Mcgoldrick & Jean Shackelford, 1999. "Toward A Feminist Pedagogy In Economics," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 5(1), pages 29-44.
    4. Janice Peterson & KimMarie McGoldrick, 2009. "Pluralism and Economic Education: a Learning Theory Approach," International Review of Economic Education, Economics Network, University of Bristol, vol. 8(2), pages 72-90.
    5. Timothy A. Wunder & Thomas Kemp & Scott England, 2009. "Fact Based Economic Education," Journal of Economic Issues, M.E. Sharpe, Inc., vol. 43(2), pages 467-476, June.
    6. Tonia Warnecke, 2009. "Teaching globalisation from a feminist pluralist perspective," International Journal of Pluralism and Economics Education, Inderscience Enterprises Ltd, vol. 1(1/2), pages 93-107.
    7. Geoffrey Schneider, 2009. "Teaching Heterodox Economics: Introduction to the Special Issue," Forum for Social Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 38(2-3), pages 91-96, January.
    8. Geoffrey Schneider, 2009. "Teaching Heterodox Economics: Introduction to the Special Issue," Forum for Social Economics, Springer;The Association for Social Economics, vol. 38(2), pages 91-96, July.
    9. Zohreh Emami & John Davis, 2009. "Democracy, education and economics," International Journal of Pluralism and Economics Education, Inderscience Enterprises Ltd, vol. 1(1/2), pages 37-45.
    10. Ulla Grapard, 1995. "Robinson Crusoe: The quintessential economic man?," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 1(1), pages 33-52.
    11. I. David Wheat, 2009. "Empowering students to compare ways economists think: the case of the housing bubble," International Journal of Pluralism and Economics Education, Inderscience Enterprises Ltd, vol. 1(1/2), pages 65-86.
    12. Nancy Folbre, 1995. ""Holding hands at midnight": The paradox of caring labor," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 1(1), pages 73-92.
    13. Sean Mallin, 2009. "Teaching alternative approaches to the firm," International Journal of Pluralism and Economics Education, Inderscience Enterprises Ltd, vol. 1(1/2), pages 87-92.
    14. Daniel Leclerc & Ed Ford & E. Ford, 2009. "A Constructivist Learning Approach to Income Inequality, Poverty and the “American Dream”," Forum for Social Economics, Springer;The Association for Social Economics, vol. 38(2), pages 201-208, July.
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