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Toward A Feminist Pedagogy In Economics

Author

Listed:
  • April Laskey Aerni
  • Robin Bartlett
  • Margaret Lewis
  • Kim Marie Mcgoldrick
  • Jean Shackelford

Abstract

Feminist economists have used feminist thought to analyze and revise the discipline of economics. This paper extends these analyses to the teaching of economics in college and suggests that feminist teaching methods might serve economists well in transforming the economics classroom to one that is more hospitable to wider audiences. The approach explored proceeds from the intersections of two avenues for incorporating more inclusive teaching methods. In the McIntosh tradition, stages for making course contents more inclusive are presented along with a discussion of how to develop inclusive classroom learning environments. The interaction of contents and methods and the implications of feminist thought for the teaching of economics are explored.

Suggested Citation

  • April Laskey Aerni & Robin Bartlett & Margaret Lewis & Kim Marie Mcgoldrick & Jean Shackelford, 1999. "Toward A Feminist Pedagogy In Economics," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 5(1), pages 29-44.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:femeco:v:5:y:1999:i:1:p:29-44
    DOI: 10.1080/135457099338139
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. repec:mes:jeciss:v:29:y:1995:i:2:p:555-565 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Shackelford, Jean, 1992. "Feminist Pedagogy: A Means for Bringing Critical Thinking and Creativity to the Economics Classroom," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(2), pages 570-576, May.
    3. Kimmarie McGoldrick, 1998. "Service-Learning in Economics: A Detailed Application," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 29(4), pages 365-376, January.
    4. Ferber, Marianne A, 1995. "The Study of Economics: A Feminist Critique," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 85(2), pages 357-361, May.
    5. Becker, William E & Watts, Michael, 1996. "Chalk and Talk: A National Survey on Teaching Undergraduate Economics," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 86(2), pages 448-453, May.
    6. Michael K. Salemi, 1996. "Where Have All the Majors Gone?," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 27(4), pages 323-325, October.
    7. William E. Becker, 1997. "Teaching Economics to Undergraduates," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 35(3), pages 1347-1373, September.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Robert F. Garnett & Jack Reardon, 2011. "Pluralism in Economics Education," Chapters,in: International Handbook on Teaching and Learning Economics, chapter 23 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    2. Robert Garnett & John Reardon, 2011. "Big Think: A Model for Critical Inquiry in Economics Courses," Working Papers 201102, Texas Christian University, Department of Economics.
    3. Robin Bartlett & Marianne Ferber & Carole Green, 2009. "The Committee on Economic Education: Its Effect on the Introductory Course and Women in Economics," Forum for Social Economics, Springer;The Association for Social Economics, vol. 38(2), pages 153-172, July.
    4. Zohreh Emami, 2013. "Teaching and learning for economic life," Chapters,in: Handbook of Research on Gender and Economic Life, chapter 6, pages 77-90 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    5. Robin L. Bartlett, 2011. "Integrating Race, Gender and Class," Chapters,in: International Handbook on Teaching and Learning Economics, chapter 20 Edward Elgar Publishing.

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