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Judy Z. Stephenson

Personal Details

First Name:Judy
Middle Name:Z.
Last Name:Stephenson
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pst744
https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/construction/people/dr-judy-stephenson
Bartlett School of Construction & Project Management, University College London, 1-19 Torrington Place London WC1E 6BT
Twitter: @judyzara

Affiliation

(95%) Bartlett School of Construction and Project Management
University College London (UCL)

London, United Kingdom
https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/construction/
RePEc:edi:scucluk (more details at EDIRC)

(5%) Economic and Social History
Oxford University

Oxford, United Kingdom
http://www.history.ox.ac.uk/ecohist/
RePEc:edi:eshoxuk (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles Books

Working papers

  1. Paker, Meredith & Stephenson, Judy & Wallis, Patrick, 2021. "Unskilled labour before the Industrial Revolution," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 108562, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  2. Coffman, D'Maris & Stephenson, Judy Z. & Sussman, Nathan, 2020. "Financing the rebuilding of the City of London after the Great Fire of 1666," CEPR Discussion Papers 15471, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  3. Judy Stephenson, 2018. "Looking for work? Or looking for workers? Days and hours of work in London construction in the eighteenth century," Oxford Economic and Social History Working Papers _162, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  4. Judy Z. Stephenson, 2016. "The pay of labourers and unskilled men on London building sites, 1660 – 1770," Working Papers 24, Department of Economic and Social History at the University of Cambridge.

Articles

  1. Judy Z. Stephenson, 2020. "Working days in a London construction team in the eighteenth century: evidence from St Paul's Cathedral," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 73(2), pages 409-430, May.
  2. Stephenson, Judy Z., 2019. "Empires, guns, and economic growth: thoughts on the implications of Satia’s work for economic history," Journal of Global History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 14(3), pages 456-458, November.
  3. Stephenson, Judy Z., 2019. "The Economic Institutions of Construction in London after the Great Fire," Enterprise & Society, Cambridge University Press, vol. 20(1), pages 229-252, March.
  4. Judy Z. Stephenson, 2019. "Mistaken wages: the cost of labour in the early modern English economy, a reply to Robert C. Allen," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 72(2), pages 755-769, May.
  5. Judy Stephenson, 2018. "An age of risk: politics and economy in early modern Britain – By Emily C. Nacol," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 71(2), pages 671-672, May.
  6. Judy Z. Stephenson, 2018. "‘Real’ wages? Contractors, workers, and pay in London building trades, 1650–1800," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 71(1), pages 106-132, February.
  7. Judy Stephenson, 2015. "Martin Allen and D'Maris Coffman , eds., Money, prices and wages: essays in honour of Professor Nicholas Mayhew ( Basingstoke : Palgrave Macmillan , 2015 . Pp xiv + 284. 38 figs. 51 tabs. ISBN 9781137," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 68(4), pages 1443-1444, November.

Books

  1. Judy Z. Stephenson, 2020. "Contracts and Pay," Palgrave Studies in Economic History, Palgrave Macmillan, number 978-3-319-57508-7.
  2. John Hatcher & Judy Z. Stephenson (ed.), 2018. "Seven Centuries of Unreal Wages," Palgrave Studies in Economic History, Palgrave Macmillan, number 978-3-319-96962-6.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Judy Stephenson, 2018. "Looking for work? Or looking for workers? Days and hours of work in London construction in the eighteenth century," Oxford Economic and Social History Working Papers _162, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Peter Sandholt Jensen & Cristina Victoria Radu & Paul Sharp, 2019. "Days Worked and Seasonality Patterns of Work in Eighteenth Century Denmark," Working Papers 0162, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).
    2. Gary, Kathryn, 2019. "The distinct seasonality of early modern casual labor and the short durations of individual working years: Sweden 1500-1800," Lund Papers in Economic History 189, Lund University, Department of Economic History.
    3. Ericsson, Johan & Molinder, Jakob, 2018. "A Workers’ Revolution in Sweden? Exploring Economic Growth and Distributional Change with Detailed Data on Construction Workers’ Wages, 1831–1900," Lund Papers in Economic History 181, Lund University, Department of Economic History.
    4. Jane Humphries & Benjamin Schneider, 2019. "Wages at the Wheel: Were Spinners Part of the High Wage Economy?," Oxford Economic and Social History Working Papers _174, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.

  2. Judy Z. Stephenson, 2016. "The pay of labourers and unskilled men on London building sites, 1660 – 1770," Working Papers 24, Department of Economic and Social History at the University of Cambridge.

    Cited by:

    1. Stephenson, Judy Z., 2018. "Looking for work? Or looking for workers? Days and hours of work in London construction in the eighteenth century," MPRA Paper 84828, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Robert C. Allen, 2017. "Real Wages Once More: A Response to Judy Stephenson," Working Papers 20170006, New York University Abu Dhabi, Department of Social Science, revised Jul 2017.
    3. Rota, Mauro & Weisdorf, Jacob, 2020. "Italy and the Little Divergence in Wages and Prices: New Data, New Results," CEPR Discussion Papers 14295, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    4. Richard J. Blakemore, 2017. "Pieces of eight, pieces of eight: seamen's earnings and the venture economy of early modern seafaring," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 70(4), pages 1153-1184, November.
    5. Rota, Mauro & Weisdorf, Jacob, 2019. "Why was the First Industrial Revolution English? Roman Real Wages and the Little Divergence within Europe Reconsidered," CAGE Online Working Paper Series 400, Competitive Advantage in the Global Economy (CAGE).

Articles

  1. Judy Z. Stephenson, 2020. "Working days in a London construction team in the eighteenth century: evidence from St Paul's Cathedral," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 73(2), pages 409-430, May.

    Cited by:

    1. Mario García-Zúñiga, 2020. "Builders’ Working Time in Eighteenth Century Madrid," Working Papers 0195, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).

  2. Judy Z. Stephenson, 2019. "Mistaken wages: the cost of labour in the early modern English economy, a reply to Robert C. Allen," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 72(2), pages 755-769, May.

    Cited by:

    1. Judy Z. Stephenson, 2020. "Working days in a London construction team in the eighteenth century: evidence from St Paul's Cathedral," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 73(2), pages 409-430, May.
    2. Mario García-Zúñiga & Ernesto López-Losa, 2019. "Building Workers in Madrid (1737-1805). New Wage Series and Working Lives," Working Papers 0152, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).

  3. Judy Z. Stephenson, 2018. "‘Real’ wages? Contractors, workers, and pay in London building trades, 1650–1800," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 71(1), pages 106-132, February.

    Cited by:

    1. Peter Sandholt Jensen & Cristina Victoria Radu & Paul Sharp, 2020. "Standards of Living and Skill Premia in Eighteenth Century Denmark: What can we learn from a large microlevel wage database?," Working Papers 0180, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).
    2. Philip T. Hoffman, 2020. "The Great Divergence: Why Britain Industrialised First," Australian Economic History Review, Economic History Society of Australia and New Zealand, vol. 60(2), pages 126-147, July.
    3. Emmanuel Bovari & Victor Court, 2019. "Energy, knowledge, and demo-economic development in the long run: a unified growth model," Working Papers hal-01698755, HAL.
    4. Geloso, Vincent J. & Salter, Alexander W., 2020. "State capacity and economic development: Causal mechanism or correlative filter?," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 170(C), pages 372-385.
    5. Ericsson, Johan & Molinder, Jakob, 2018. "A Workers’ Revolution in Sweden? Exploring Economic Growth and Distributional Change with Detailed Data on Construction Workers’ Wages, 1831–1900," Lund Papers in Economic History 181, Lund University, Department of Economic History.

Books

    Sorry, no citations of books recorded.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 4 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-HIS: Business, Economic & Financial History (4) 2016-07-09 2018-04-02 2018-07-09 2021-02-08. Author is listed
  2. NEP-KNM: Knowledge Management & Knowledge Economy (1) 2018-07-09. Author is listed
  3. NEP-LMA: Labor Markets - Supply, Demand, & Wages (1) 2021-02-08. Author is listed

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