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David Ian Stanton

Personal Details

First Name:David
Middle Name:Ian
Last Name:Stanton
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pst435

Affiliation

Crawford School of Public Policy
Australian National University

Canberra, Australia
http://www.crawford.anu.edu.au/

: +61 2 6125 4705
+61 2 6125 5448
Crawford Building, Lennox Crossing, Building #132, Canberra ACT 2601
RePEc:edi:asanuau (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Matthew Gray & David Stanton, 2004. "Lessons of United States welfare reforms for Australian social policy," Others 0405002, EconWPA.
  2. David de Vaus & Matthew Gray & David Stanton, 2004. "Measuring the value of unpaid household, caring and voluntary work of older Australians," Labor and Demography 0405006, EconWPA.
  3. Ruth Weston & Matthew Gray & Lixia Qu & David Stanton, 2004. "Long work hours and the wellbeing of fathers and their families," Labor and Demography 0405007, EconWPA.

Articles

  1. Paul D. Collins & Andrew Podger & Keyong Dong & Andrew Podger & David Stanton & Peter Whiteford, 2014. "Designing Social Security Systems: Learning From Australia And Other Countries," Public Administration & Development, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 34(4), pages 231-250, October.
  2. Matthew Gray & David Stanton, 2010. "Costs of children and Equivalence Scales: A Review of Methodological Issues and Australian Estimates," Australian Journal of Labour Economics (AJLE), Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School, vol. 13(1), pages 99-115.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. David de Vaus & Matthew Gray & David Stanton, 2004. "Measuring the value of unpaid household, caring and voluntary work of older Australians," Labor and Demography 0405006, EconWPA.

    Cited by:

    1. Liam Delaney & Francis O'Toole, 2008. "Preferences for specific social welfare expenditures in Ireland," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 15(12), pages 985-989.
    2. Catherine Pollak & Nicolas Sirven, 2011. "The social economy of ageing : Job quality and pathways beyond the labour market in Europe," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) halshs-00639928, HAL.
    3. Delaney, Liam & Fahey, Tony, 2005. "Social and Economic Value of Sport in Ireland," Research Series, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI), number BMI180.
    4. Choi, Eun-Young & Johnson, Thomas G., 2014. "Economic Impact of the Informal Childcare Sector in Kansas," Journal of Regional Analysis and Policy, Mid-Continent Regional Science Association, vol. 44(1).

  2. Ruth Weston & Matthew Gray & Lixia Qu & David Stanton, 2004. "Long work hours and the wellbeing of fathers and their families," Labor and Demography 0405007, EconWPA.

    Cited by:

    1. Cowling, Marc, 2007. "Still At Work? An empirical test of competing theories of long hours culture," MPRA Paper 1614, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Leila Maron & Danièle Meulders, 2008. "Effets de la parentalité sur l'emploi en Europe," Brussels Economic Review, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles, vol. 51(2/3), pages 185-220.
    3. Rubia R. Valente & Brian J. L. Berry, 2017. "Acculturation of Immigrant Latinos into the U.S. Workplace: Evidence from the Working Hours-life Satisfaction Relationship," Applied Research in Quality of Life, Springer;International Society for Quality-of-Life Studies, vol. 12(2), pages 451-479, June.
    4. Rubia R. Valente & Brian J. L. Berry, 2016. "Working Hours and Life Satisfaction: A Cross-Cultural Comparison of Latin America and the United States," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 17(3), pages 1173-1204, June.
    5. Natalie Skinner & Janine Chapman, 2013. "Work-life balance and family friendly policies," Evidence Base, Australia and New Zealand School of Government, vol. 2013(4), pages 1-17, December.
    6. Dockery, Alfred & Li, Jianghong & Kendall, Garth, 2009. "Parents' work patterns and adolescent mental health," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 68(4), pages 689-698, February.
    7. Paul Callister, 2005. "The changing gender distribution of paid and unpaid work in New Zealand," Treasury Working Paper Series 05/07, New Zealand Treasury.
    8. Robert Rudolf, 2014. "Work Shorter, Be Happier? Longitudinal Evidence from the Korean Five-Day Working Policy," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 15(5), pages 1139-1163, October.
    9. Nick Parr, 2010. "Childlessness Among Men in Australia," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 29(3), pages 319-338, June.
    10. Aydogan Ulker, 2006. "Do Non-standard Working Hours Cause Negative Health Effects? Some Evidence from Panel Data," CEPR Discussion Papers 518, Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
    11. Maria Pereira & Filipe Coelho, 2013. "Work Hours and Well Being: An Investigation of Moderator Effects," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 111(1), pages 235-253, March.
    12. Bryan, Mark L. & Nandi, Alita, 2015. "Working hours, work identity and subjective wellbeing," ISER Working Paper Series 2015-21, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    13. Golden, Lonnie & Wiens-Tuers, Barbara, 2006. "To your happiness? Extra hours of labor supply and worker well-being," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 35(2), pages 382-397, April.

Articles

  1. Matthew Gray & David Stanton, 2010. "Costs of children and Equivalence Scales: A Review of Methodological Issues and Australian Estimates," Australian Journal of Labour Economics (AJLE), Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School, vol. 13(1), pages 99-115.

    Cited by:

    1. Alfred Michael Dockery & Sherry Bawa, 2013. "The Impact of Children on Australian Couples' Wealth Accumulation," Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre Working Paper series WP1302, Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School.
    2. Gerlinde Verbist & Wim Van Lancker, 2016. "Horizontal and Vertical Equity Objectives of Child Benefit Systems: An Empirical Assessment for European Countries," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 128(3), pages 1299-1318, September.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 3 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. No paper was announced in a field specific NEP report

Corrections

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