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Daniel Martin

Personal Details

First Name:Daniel
Middle Name:
Last Name:Martin
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pma1484
http://www.martinonline.org/daniel

Affiliation

Managerial Economics and Decision Sciences (MEDS)
Kellogg Graduate School of Management
Northwestern University

Evanston, Illinois (United States)
http://www.kellogg.northwestern.edu/meds/index.htm

: (847) 491-3603
(847) 467-1220
2001 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208-2009
RePEc:edi:menwuus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Ginger Zhe Jin & Michael Luca & Daniel J. Martin, 2018. "Complex Disclosure," NBER Working Papers 24675, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Elias Bouacida & Daniel Martin, 2017. "Predictive Power in Behavioral Welfare Economics," PSE Working Papers halshs-01489252, HAL.
  3. Daniel Martin, 2016. "Consumer Theory with Inattention to Prices," 2016 Meeting Papers 379, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  4. Ginger Zhe Jin & Michael Luca & Daniel Martin, 2015. "Is No News (Perceived as) Bad News? An Experimental Investigation of Information Disclosure," NBER Working Papers 21099, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Daniel Martin & Chris Tonetti & Andrew Caplin & Joseph Briggs, 2015. "Due Diligence: Job Search with Rationally Inattentive Workers," 2015 Meeting Papers 287, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  6. Andrew Caplin & Daniel J. Martin, 2012. "Defaults and Attention: The Drop Out Effect," NBER Working Papers 17988, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Andrew Caplin & Daniel Martin, 2011. "A Testable Theory of Imperfect Perception," NBER Working Papers 17163, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. Mark Dean & Daniel Martin, 2011. "Testing for Rationality with Consumption Data: Demographics and Heterogeneity," Working Papers 2011-11, Brown University, Department of Economics.
    repec:hal:wpaper:halshs-01489252 is not listed on IDEAS

Articles

  1. Martin, Daniel, 2017. "Strategic pricing with rational inattention to quality," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 104(C), pages 131-145.
  2. Andrew Caplin & Daniel Martin, 2017. "Defaults and Attention: The Drop Out Effect," Revue économique, Presses de Sciences-Po, vol. 68(5), pages 747-755.
  3. Andrew Caplin & Daniel Martin, 2016. "The Dual-Process Drift Diffusion Model: Evidence From Response Times," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 54(2), pages 1274-1282, April.
  4. Mark Dean & Daniel Martin, 2016. "Measuring Rationality with the Minimum Cost of Revealed Preference Violations," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 98(3), pages 524-534, July.
  5. Andrew Caplin & Daniel Martin, 2015. "A Testable Theory of Imperfect Perception," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 125(582), pages 184-202, February.
  6. Andrew Caplin & Mark Dean & Daniel Martin, 2011. "Search and Satisficing," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 101(7), pages 2899-2922, December.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Wikipedia mentions

(Only mentions on Wikipedia that link back to a page on a RePEc service)
  1. Andrew Caplin & Mark Dean & Daniel Martin, 2011. "Search and Satisficing," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 101(7), pages 2899-2922, December.

    Mentioned in:

    1. Search and Satisficing (AER 2011) in ReplicationWiki ()

Working papers

  1. Ginger Zhe Jin & Michael Luca & Daniel Martin, 2015. "Is No News (Perceived as) Bad News? An Experimental Investigation of Information Disclosure," NBER Working Papers 21099, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Volker Benndorf, 2018. "Voluntary Disclosure of Private Information and Unraveling in the Market for Lemons: An Experiment," Games, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 9(2), pages 1-17, May.
    2. Jeanne Hagenbach & Frédéric Koessler, 2017. "Simple versus rich language in disclosure games," Post-Print hal-01629311, HAL.
    3. Andreas Oehler & Stefan Wendt, 2017. "Good Consumer Information: the Information Paradigm at its (Dead) End?," Journal of Consumer Policy, Springer, vol. 40(2), pages 179-191, June.
    4. Schwardmann, Peter & Ispano, Alessandro, 2016. "Competitive pricing and quality disclosure to cursed consumers," Annual Conference 2016 (Augsburg): Demographic Change 145573, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    5. Jos Jansen & Andreas Pollak, 2015. "Strategic Disclosure of Demand Information by Duopolists: Theory and Experiment," Discussion Paper Series of the Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods 2015_09, Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods.
    6. Ertac, Seda & Koçkesen, Levent & Ozdemir, Duygu, 2016. "The role of verifiability and privacy in the strategic provision of performance feedback: Theory and experimental evidence," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 100(C), pages 24-45.
    7. Benjamin B. Bederson & Ginger Zhe Jin & Phillip Leslie & Alexander J. Quinn & Ben Zou, 2016. "Incomplete Disclosure: Evidence of Signaling and Countersignaling," NBER Working Papers 22710, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Seda Ertac & Mert Gumren & Levent Kockesen, 2017. "Strategic Feedback in Teams: Theory and Experimental Evidence," Koç University-TUSIAD Economic Research Forum Working Papers 1714, Koc University-TUSIAD Economic Research Forum.

  2. Andrew Caplin & Daniel J. Martin, 2012. "Defaults and Attention: The Drop Out Effect," NBER Working Papers 17988, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Kenan Kalaycı & Marta Serra-Garcia, 2016. "Complexity and biases," Experimental Economics, Springer;Economic Science Association, vol. 19(1), pages 31-50, March.
    2. Altmann, Steffen & Falk, Armin & Heidhues, Paul & Jayaraman, Rajshri, 2014. "Defaults and Donations: Evidence from a Field Experiment," IZA Discussion Papers 8680, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. McConnell, Margaret, 2013. "Behavioral economics and aging," The Journal of the Economics of Ageing, Elsevier, vol. 1, pages 83-89.
    4. Tse, Alan & Friesen, Lana & Kalaycı, Kenan, 2016. "Complexity and asset legitimacy in retirement investment," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 35-48.
    5. Altmann, Steffen & Falk, Armin & Grunewald, Andreas, 2015. "Incentives and Information as Driving Forces of Default Effects," Discussion Paper Series of SFB/TR 15 Governance and the Efficiency of Economic Systems 516, Free University of Berlin, Humboldt University of Berlin, University of Bonn, University of Mannheim, University of Munich.
    6. Blumenstock, Joshua & Callen, Michael & Ghani, Tarek, 2016. "Mobile-izing Savings with Automatic Contributions: Experimental Evidence on Present Bias and Default Effects in Afghanistan," CEPR Discussion Papers 11400, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.

  3. Andrew Caplin & Daniel Martin, 2011. "A Testable Theory of Imperfect Perception," NBER Working Papers 17163, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Dirk Bergemann & Stephen Morris, 2013. "Bayes Correlated Equilibrium and the Comparison of Information Structures in Games," Working Papers 054-2013, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Econometric Research Program..
    2. Andrew Caplin & Mark Dean & John Leahy, 2017. "Rationally Inattentive Behavior: Characterizing and Generalizing Shannon Entropy," NBER Working Papers 23652, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Tamer Boyaci & Yalçin Akçay, 2016. "Pricing when customers have limited attention," ESMT Research Working Papers ESMT-16-01, ESMT European School of Management and Technology, revised 19 Jan 2017.
    4. Dohmen, Thomas, 2014. "Behavioural Labour Economics: Advances and Future Directions," IZA Discussion Papers 8263, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Dirk Bergemann & Stephen Morris, 2013. "Bayes Correlated Equilibrium and the Comparison of Information Structures," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 1822R, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University.
    6. Cunningham, Thomas, 2013. "Biases and Implicit Knowledge," MPRA Paper 50292, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Martin, Daniel, 2017. "Strategic pricing with rational inattention to quality," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 104(C), pages 131-145.
    8. Sandro Ambuehl, 2017. "An Offer You Can't Refuse? Incentives Change How We Inform Ourselves and What We Believe," CESifo Working Paper Series 6296, CESifo Group Munich.
    9. Dirk Bergemann & Stephen Morris, 2011. "Correlated Equilibrium in Games with Incomplete Information," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 1822, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University.
    10. Dirk Bergemann & Stephen Morris, 2013. "The Comparison of Information Structures in Games: Bayes Correlated Equilibrium and Individual Sufficiency," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 1909, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University.
    11. Altmann, Steffen & Falk, Armin & Grunewald, Andreas, 2015. "Incentives and Information as Driving Forces of Default Effects," Discussion Paper Series of SFB/TR 15 Governance and the Efficiency of Economic Systems 516, Free University of Berlin, Humboldt University of Berlin, University of Bonn, University of Mannheim, University of Munich.
    12. Andrew Caplin & Mark Dean, 2014. "Revealed Preference, Rational Inattention, and Costly Information Acquisition," NBER Working Papers 19876, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    13. Tom Cunningham & Jonathan de Quidt, 2016. "Implicit Preferences Inferred from Choice," CESifo Working Paper Series 5704, CESifo Group Munich.
    14. Lunn, Pete & Somerville, Jason J., 2015. "Surplus Identification with Non-Linear Returns," Papers WP522, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
    15. Caplin, Andrew, 2014. "Rational inattention and revealed preference: The data-theoretic approach to economic modeling," Research in Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(4), pages 295-305.
    16. Delavande, Adeline & Zafar, Basit, 2012. "Information and anti-American attitudes," Staff Reports 558, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, revised 01 Sep 2015.

  4. Mark Dean & Daniel Martin, 2011. "Testing for Rationality with Consumption Data: Demographics and Heterogeneity," Working Papers 2011-11, Brown University, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Jose Apesteguia & Miguel A. Ballester, 2012. "Choice by sequential procedures," Economics Working Papers 1309, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra.
    2. Jim Engle-Warnick & Natalia Mishagina, 2014. "Insensitivity to Prices in a Dictator Game," CIRANO Working Papers 2014s-19, CIRANO.
    3. Per Hjertstrand & James Swofford, 2014. "Are the choices of people stochastically rational? A stochastic test of the number of revealed preference violations," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 46(4), pages 1495-1519, June.
    4. Halevy, Yoram & Persitz, Dotan & Zrill, Lanny, 2016. "Parametric Recoverability of Preferences," Microeconomics.ca working papers yoram_halevy-2016-11, Vancouver School of Economics, revised 02 Nov 2016.

Articles

  1. Martin, Daniel, 2017. "Strategic pricing with rational inattention to quality," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 104(C), pages 131-145.

    Cited by:

    1. Ludmila Matyskova, 2018. "Bayesian Persuasion with Costly Information Acquisition," CERGE-EI Working Papers wp614, The Center for Economic Research and Graduate Education - Economics Institute, Prague.
    2. Andrew Caplin & Mark Dean & John Leahy, 2017. "Rationally Inattentive Behavior: Characterizing and Generalizing Shannon Entropy," NBER Working Papers 23652, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. E. Carroni & L. Ferrari & S. Righi, 2018. "The Price of Discovering Your Needs Online," Working Papers wp1116, Dipartimento Scienze Economiche, Universita' di Bologna.

  2. Andrew Caplin & Daniel Martin, 2017. "Defaults and Attention: The Drop Out Effect," Revue économique, Presses de Sciences-Po, vol. 68(5), pages 747-755.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  3. Andrew Caplin & Daniel Martin, 2016. "The Dual-Process Drift Diffusion Model: Evidence From Response Times," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 54(2), pages 1274-1282, April.

    Cited by:

    1. Balcombe, Kelvin & Fraser, Iain & Williams, Louis & McSorley, Eugene, 2017. "Examining the relationship between visual attention and stated preferences: A discrete choice experiment using eye-tracking," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 144(C), pages 238-257.
    2. Ambroise Descamps & S´ebastien Massoni & Lionel Page, 2017. "Optimal hesitation, an experiment," QuBE Working Papers 048, QUT Business School.
    3. Leonidas Spiliopoulos & Andreas Ortmann, 2018. "The BCD of response time analysis in experimental economics," Experimental Economics, Springer;Economic Science Association, vol. 21(2), pages 383-433, June.
    4. Ennio Bilancini & Leonardo Boncinelli & Luigi Luini, 2017. "Does Focality Depend on the Mode of Cognition? Experimental Evidence on Pure Coordination Games," Department of Economics University of Siena 771, Department of Economics, University of Siena.
    5. Recalde, María P. & Riedl, Arno & Vesterlund, Lise, 2018. "Error-prone inference from response time: The case of intuitive generosity in public-good games," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 160(C), pages 132-147.
    6. Merkel, Anna & Lohse, Johannes, 2016. "Is fairness intuitive? An experiment accounting for the role of subjective utility differences under time pressure," Working Papers 0627, University of Heidelberg, Department of Economics.
    7. Paola Manzini & Marco Mariotti, 2016. "Dual Random Utility Maximisation," Discussion Paper Series, Department of Economics 201605, Department of Economics, University of St. Andrews, revised 12 Mar 2017.

  4. Mark Dean & Daniel Martin, 2016. "Measuring Rationality with the Minimum Cost of Revealed Preference Violations," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 98(3), pages 524-534, July.

    Cited by:

    1. Victor Aguiar & Roberto Serrano, 2015. "Slutsky Matrix Norms and Revealed Preference Tests of Consumer Behaviour," Working Papers 2015-1, Brown University, Department of Economics.
    2. Elias Bouacida & Daniel Martin, 2017. "Predictive Power in Behavioral Welfare Economics," PSE Working Papers halshs-01489252, HAL.
    3. Aguiar, Victor H. & Serrano, Roberto, 2017. "Slutsky matrix norms: The size, classification, and comparative statics of bounded rationality," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 172(C), pages 163-201.
    4. Shiozawa, Kohei, 2016. "Revealed preference test and shortest path problem; graph theoretic structure of the rationalizability test," Journal of Mathematical Economics, Elsevier, vol. 67(C), pages 38-48.
    5. Jan Heufer & Per Hjertstrand, 2015. "Homothetic Efficiency and Test Power: A Non-Parametric Approach," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 15-064/I, Tinbergen Institute.
    6. Miguel Costa-Gomes & Carlos Cueva & Georgios Gerasimou & Matus Tejiscak, 2014. "Choice, Deferral and Consistency," Discussion Paper Series, Department of Economics 201416, Department of Economics, University of St. Andrews, revised 26 Dec 2016.
    7. Brocas, Isabelle & Carrillo, Juan D & Combs, T. Dalton & Kodaverdian, Niree, 2015. "Consistency in Simple vs. Complex Choices over the Life Cycle," CEPR Discussion Papers 10457, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    8. Kohei Shiozawa, 2015. "Note on goodness-of-fit measures for the revealed preference test: The computational complexity of the minimum cost index," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 35(4), pages 2455-2461.
    9. Andreas Drichoutis & Rodolfo M. Nayga, Jr., 2017. "Economic rationality under cognitive load," Working Papers 2017-2, Agricultural University of Athens, Department Of Agricultural Economics.
    10. Keith Marzilli Ericson & Philipp Kircher & Johannes Spinnewijn & Amanda Starc, 2015. "Inferring Risk Perceptions and Preferences using Choice from Insurance Menus: Theory and Evidence," NBER Working Papers 21797, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    11. Jim Engle-Warnick & Natalia Mishagina, 2014. "Insensitivity to Prices in a Dictator Game," CIRANO Working Papers 2014s-19, CIRANO.
    12. Kohei Shiozawa, 2015. "Note on the goodness-of-fit measure for GARP; NP-hardness of minimum cost index," Discussion Papers in Economics and Business 15-18, Osaka University, Graduate School of Economics and Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP).
    13. Costa-Gomes, Miguel & Cueva, Carlos & Gerasimou, Georgios, 2014. "Choice, Deferral and Consistency," SIRE Discussion Papers 2015-17, Scottish Institute for Research in Economics (SIRE).
    14. Pawel Dziewulski, 2018. "Just-noticeable difference as a behavioural foundation of the critical cost-efficiency," Economics Series Working Papers 848, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    15. Halevy, Yoram & Persitz, Dotan & Zrill, Lanny, 2016. "Parametric Recoverability of Preferences," Microeconomics.ca working papers yoram_halevy-2016-11, Vancouver School of Economics, revised 02 Nov 2016.
    16. COSAERT Sam, 2017. "What types are there?," LISER Working Paper Series 2017-01, LISER.
    17. Daniel M�ller, 2017. "The anatomy of distributional preferences with group identity," Working Papers 2017-02, Faculty of Economics and Statistics, University of Innsbruck, revised Mar 2017.
    18. Kohei Shiozawa, 2015. "Revealed Preference Test and Shortest Path Problem; Graph Theoretic Structure of the Rationalizability Test," Discussion Papers in Economics and Business 15-17-Rev.2, Osaka University, Graduate School of Economics and Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP), revised Aug 2016.

  5. Andrew Caplin & Daniel Martin, 2015. "A Testable Theory of Imperfect Perception," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 125(582), pages 184-202, February.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  6. Andrew Caplin & Mark Dean & Daniel Martin, 2011. "Search and Satisficing," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 101(7), pages 2899-2922, December.

    Cited by:

    1. Wiebke Roß & Jens Weghake, 2018. "Wa(h)re Liebe: Was Online-Dating-Plattformen über zweiseitige Märkte lehren," TUC Working Papers in Economics 0017, Abteilung für Volkswirtschaftslehre, Technische Universität Clausthal (Department of Economics, Technical University Clausthal).
    2. Kenan Kalaycı & Marta Serra-Garcia, 2016. "Complexity and biases," Experimental Economics, Springer;Economic Science Association, vol. 19(1), pages 31-50, March.
    3. Larcom, Shaun & Rauch, Ferdinand & Willems, Tim, 2015. "The benefits of forced experimentation: strikingevidence from the London Underground network," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 63832, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    4. Pan, Jinrui & Shachat, Jason & Wei, Sijia, 2018. "Cognitive stress and learning Economic Order Quantity (EOQ) inventory management: An experimental investigation," MPRA Paper 86221, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Nishimura, Hiroki, 2018. "The transitive core: inference of welfare from nontransitive preference relations," Theoretical Economics, Econometric Society, vol. 13(2), May.
    6. Elena Reutskaja & Rosemarie Nagel & Colin F. Camerer & Antonio Rangel, 2011. "Search Dynamics in Consumer Choice under Time Pressure: An Eye-Tracking Study," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 101(2), pages 900-926, April.
    7. Elias Bouacida & Daniel Martin, 2017. "Predictive Power in Behavioral Welfare Economics," PSE Working Papers halshs-01489252, HAL.
    8. Andrei Gomberg, 2011. "Vote Revelation: Empirical Characterization of Scoring Rules," Working Papers 1102, Centro de Investigacion Economica, ITAM.
    9. Daniela Di Cagno & Tibor Neugebauer & Carlos Rodriguez-Palmero & Abdolkarim Sadrieh, 2014. "Recall Searching with and without Recall," Working Papers 2014/14, Economics Department, Universitat Jaume I, Castellón (Spain).
    10. Aguiar, Victor H. & Boccardi, Maria Jose & Dean, Mark, 2016. "Satisficing and stochastic choice," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 166(C), pages 445-482.
    11. Jacopo Magnani & Aspen Gorry & Ryan Oprea, 2016. "Time and State Dependence in an Ss Decision Experiment," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 8(1), pages 285-310, January.
    12. Axel Sonntag, 2013. "Search Costs in Consumer Product Choice: Does Delaying the Provision of Information increase Choice Efficiency?," Working Paper series, University of East Anglia, Centre for Behavioural and Experimental Social Science (CBESS) 13-05, School of Economics, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK..
    13. King King Li & Toru Suzuki, 2016. "Jury voting without objective probability," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer;The Society for Social Choice and Welfare, vol. 46(2), pages 389-406, February.
    14. Samek, Anya & Hur, Inkyoung & Kim, Sung-Hee & Yi, Ji Soo, 2016. "An experimental study of the decision process with interactive technology," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 130(C), pages 20-32.
    15. Andrew Caplin & Mark Dean & John Leahy, 2017. "Rationally Inattentive Behavior: Characterizing and Generalizing Shannon Entropy," NBER Working Papers 23652, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    16. González-Valdés, Felipe & Ortúzar, Juan de Dios, 2018. "The Stochastic Satisficing model: A bounded rationality discrete choice model," Journal of choice modelling, Elsevier, vol. 27(C), pages 74-87.
    17. Yusufcan Masatlioglu & Daisuke Nakajima & Erkut Y. Ozbay, 2012. "Revealed Attention," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 102(5), pages 2183-2205, August.
    18. Brenčič, Vera, 2014. "Search online: Evidence from acquisition of information on online job boards and resume banks," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 112-125.
    19. Paul Koster & Stefanie Peer & Thijs Dekker, 2014. "Memory, Expectation Formation and Scheduling Choices," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 14-154/VIII, Tinbergen Institute.
    20. Sonntag, Axel, 2015. "Search costs and adaptive consumers: Short time delays do not affect choice quality," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 113(C), pages 64-79.
    21. Dean, Mark & Kıbrıs, Özgür & Masatlioglu, Yusufcan, 2017. "Limited attention and status quo bias," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 169(C), pages 93-127.
    22. Charles F. Manski, 2017. "Optimize, satisfice, or choose without deliberation? A simple minimax-regret assessment," Theory and Decision, Springer, vol. 83(2), pages 155-173, August.
    23. Leonidas Spiliopoulos & Andreas Ortmann, 2018. "The BCD of response time analysis in experimental economics," Experimental Economics, Springer;Economic Science Association, vol. 21(2), pages 383-433, June.
    24. Jacob LaRiviere & Mikolaj Czajkowski & Nick Hanley & Katherine Simpson, 2016. "What is the Causal Impact of Knowledge on Preferences in Stated Preference Studies?," Working Papers 2016-12, Faculty of Economic Sciences, University of Warsaw.
    25. Jacob LaRiviere & Mikołaj Czajkowski & Nick Hanley & Katherine Simpson, 2015. "What is the Causal Effect of Knowledge on Preferences?," Working Papers 2015-14, Faculty of Economic Sciences, University of Warsaw.
    26. Sandorf, Erlend Dancke & Campbell, Danny, 2016. "Accommodating satisficing behavior in stated choice experiments," 2016 Annual Meeting, July 31-August 2, Boston, Massachusetts 235905, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    27. Oviedo, José L. & Caparrós, Alejandro, 2015. "Information and visual attention in contingent valuation and choice modeling: field and eye-tracking experiments applied to reforestations in Spain," Journal of Forest Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(4), pages 185-204.
    28. Inkyoung Hur & Sung-Hee Kim & Anya Samek & Ji Soo Yi, 2015. "An Experimental Study of Decision Process with Interactive Technology," Artefactual Field Experiments 00427, The Field Experiments Website.
    29. Stoye, Jörg, 2015. "Choice theory when agents can randomize," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 155(C), pages 131-151.
    30. Gerke, Rafael & Hauzenberger, Klemens, 2017. "The Fisher paradox: A primer," Discussion Papers 20/2017, Deutsche Bundesbank.
    31. Tse, Alan & Friesen, Lana & Kalaycı, Kenan, 2016. "Complexity and asset legitimacy in retirement investment," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 35-48.
    32. Recalde, María P. & Riedl, Arno & Vesterlund, Lise, 2018. "Error-prone inference from response time: The case of intuitive generosity in public-good games," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 160(C), pages 132-147.
    33. Papi, Mauro, 2018. "Price competition with satisficing consumers," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 58(C), pages 252-272.
    34. Timo Henckel & Gordon Menzies & Peter Moffat & Daniel J. Zizzo, 2017. "Sticky Belief Adjustment: A Double Hurdle Model and Experimental Evidence," Working Paper Series 40, Economics Discipline Group, UTS Business School, University of Technology, Sydney.
    35. Andrew Caplin & Mark Dean, 2014. "Revealed Preference, Rational Inattention, and Costly Information Acquisition," NBER Working Papers 19876, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    36. Andrew Caplin & Daniel Martin, 2016. "The Dual-Process Drift Diffusion Model: Evidence From Response Times," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 54(2), pages 1274-1282, April.
    37. John D. Hey & Yudistira Permana & Nuttaporn Rochanahastin, 2017. "When and how to satisfice: an experimental investigation," Theory and Decision, Springer, vol. 83(3), pages 337-353, October.
    38. Luigi Mittone & Mauro Papi, 2017. "Does inducing choice procedures make individuals better off? An experimental study," Theory and Decision, Springer, vol. 83(1), pages 37-59, June.
    39. Brian T. McCann & George A. Shinkle, 2017. "Attention to Fairness versus Profits: The Determinants of Satisficing Pricing," Journal of Management Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 54(5), pages 583-612, July.
    40. Salvador Barberà & Alejandro Neme, 2015. "Ordinal Relative Satisficing Behavior: Theory and Experiments," Working Papers 790, Barcelona Graduate School of Economics.
    41. Berg, Nathan & Prakhya, Srinivas & Ranganathan, Kavitha, 2018. "A satisficing approach to eliciting risk preferences," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 82(C), pages 127-140.
    42. Caplin, Andrew & Dean, Mark, 2011. "Search, choice, and revealed preference," Theoretical Economics, Econometric Society, vol. 6(1), January.
    43. Papi, Mauro, 2012. "Satisficing choice procedures," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 84(1), pages 451-462.
    44. Hiroki Nishimura, 2014. "The Transitive Core: Inference of Welfare from Nontransitive Preference Relations," Working Papers 201419, University of California at Riverside, Department of Economics.
    45. D. Pennesi, 2016. "Deciding fast and slow," Working Papers wp1082, Dipartimento Scienze Economiche, Universita' di Bologna.
    46. Stahl, Dale O., 2018. "Boundedly rational search with positive search costs," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 168(C), pages 138-140.
    47. Bleile, Jörg, 2016. "Limited Attention in Case-Based Belief Formation," Center for Mathematical Economics Working Papers 518, Center for Mathematical Economics, Bielefeld University.
    48. King Li & Toru Suzuki, 2016. "Jury voting without objective probability," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer;The Society for Social Choice and Welfare, vol. 46(2), pages 389-406, February.
    49. Pantelis P. Analytis & Amit Kothiyal & Konstantinos Katsikopoulos, 2014. "Multi-attribute utility models as cognitive search engines," Judgment and Decision Making, Society for Judgment and Decision Making, vol. 9(5), pages 403-419, September.
    50. Valentino Dardanoni & Paola Manzini & Marco Mariotti & Christopher J. Tyson, 2018. "Inferring Cognitive Heterogeneity from Aggregate Choices," Working Paper Series 1018, Department of Economics, University of Sussex.
    51. Valentino Dardanoni & Paola Manzini & Marco Mariotti & Christopher J. Tyson, 2017. "Inferring Cognitive Heterogeneity from Aggregate Choices," Discussion Paper Series, Department of Economics 201701, Department of Economics, University of St. Andrews, revised 25 May 2017.
    52. Ambuehl, Sandro & Li, Shengwu, 2018. "Belief updating and the demand for information," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 109(C), pages 21-39.
    53. Sanjurjo, Adam, 2017. "Search with multiple attributes: Theory and empirics," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 104(C), pages 535-562.
    54. Xavier Gabaix, 2017. "Behavioral Inattention," NBER Working Papers 24096, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    55. Papi, Mauro, 2013. "Satisficing and maximizing consumers in a monopolistic screening model," Mathematical Social Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 66(3), pages 385-389.
    56. Caplin, Andrew, 2014. "Rational inattention and revealed preference: The data-theoretic approach to economic modeling," Research in Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(4), pages 295-305.
    57. Malone, Trey & Lusk, Jayson L., 2017. "The excessive choice effect meets the market: A field experiment on craft beer choice," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 67(C), pages 8-13.
    58. Dinko Dimitrov & Saptarshi Mukherjee & Nozomu Muto, 2016. "‘Divide-and-choose’ in list-based decision problems," Theory and Decision, Springer, vol. 81(1), pages 17-31, June.
    59. Matthew P. Taylor, 2017. "Information Acquisition Under Risky Conditions Across Real And Hypothetical Settings," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 55(1), pages 352-367, January.
    60. Ismaël Rafaï & Mira Toumi, 2017. "Pay Attention or Be Paid for Attention? Impact of Incentives on Allocation of Attention," GREDEG Working Papers 2017-11, Groupe de REcherche en Droit, Economie, Gestion (GREDEG CNRS), University of Nice Sophia Antipolis.

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Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 9 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-EXP: Experimental Economics (3) 2011-07-02 2012-04-23 2015-04-25. Author is listed
  2. NEP-UPT: Utility Models & Prospect Theory (3) 2011-07-02 2011-08-02 2017-05-21. Author is listed
  3. NEP-HPE: History & Philosophy of Economics (2) 2011-07-02 2013-04-27
  4. NEP-AGE: Economics of Ageing (1) 2015-08-01
  5. NEP-CBE: Cognitive & Behavioural Economics (1) 2011-08-02
  6. NEP-CSE: Economics of Strategic Management (1) 2016-08-07
  7. NEP-CTA: Contract Theory & Applications (1) 2015-04-25
  8. NEP-DEM: Demographic Economics (1) 2011-08-02
  9. NEP-DGE: Dynamic General Equilibrium (1) 2015-08-01
  10. NEP-LAW: Law & Economics (1) 2018-08-27
  11. NEP-LTV: Unemployment, Inequality & Poverty (1) 2015-08-01
  12. NEP-MIC: Microeconomics (1) 2013-04-27
  13. NEP-MKT: Marketing (1) 2016-08-07
  14. NEP-REG: Regulation (1) 2018-08-27

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