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Monica Jain

Personal Details

First Name:Monica
Middle Name:
Last Name:Jain
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pja587
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
Terminal Degree:2012 Economics Department; Queen's University (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

Bank of Canada

Ottawa, Canada
http://www.bank-banque-canada.ca/
RePEc:edi:bocgvca (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Monica Jain & Christopher S. Sutherland, 2018. "How Do Central Bank Projections and Forward Guidance Influence Private-Sector Forecasts?," Staff Working Papers 18-2, Bank of Canada.
  2. Monica Jain, 2018. "Sluggish Forecasts," Staff Working Papers 18-39, Bank of Canada.
  3. Monica Jain, 2013. "Perceived Inflation Persistence," Staff Working Papers 13-43, Bank of Canada.

Articles

  1. Monica Jain & Christopher S. Sutherland, 2020. "How Do Central Bank Projections and Forward Guidance Influence Private-Sector Forecasts?," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 16(5), pages 179-218, October.
  2. Monica Jain, 2019. "Perceived Inflation Persistence," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(1), pages 110-120, January.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Monica Jain & Christopher S. Sutherland, 2018. "How Do Central Bank Projections and Forward Guidance Influence Private-Sector Forecasts?," Staff Working Papers 18-2, Bank of Canada.

    Cited by:

    1. Jakub Rybacki, 2019. "Forward guidance and the private forecast disagreement – case of Poland," Bank i Kredyt, Narodowy Bank Polski, vol. 50(4), pages 411-428.
    2. Grahame Johnson & Sharon Kozicki & Romanos Priftis & Lena Suchanek & Jonathan Witmer & Jing Yang, 2020. "Implementation and Effectiveness of Extended Monetary Policy Tools: Lessons from the Literature," Discussion Papers 2020-16, Bank of Canada.
    3. Jeffrey R. Campbell & Thomas B. King & Anna Orlik & Rebecca Zarutskie, 2020. "Issues Regarding the Use of the Policy Rate Tool," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2020-070, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    4. Rholes, Ryan & Petersen, Luba, 2021. "Should central banks communicate uncertainty in their projections?," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 183(C), pages 320-341.
    5. Christopher S. Sutherland, 2020. "Forward Guidance and Expectation Formation: A Narrative Approach," Staff Working Papers 20-40, Bank of Canada.
    6. Emilian DOBRESCU, 2020. "Self-fulfillment degree of economic expectations within an integrated space: The European Union case study," Journal for Economic Forecasting, Institute for Economic Forecasting, vol. 0(4), pages 5-32, December.
    7. Jakub Rybacki, 2019. "Does Forward Guidance Matter in Small Open Economies? Examples from Europe," Econometric Research in Finance, SGH Warsaw School of Economics, Collegium of Economic Analysis, vol. 4(1), pages 1-26, June.
    8. Oleksiy Kryvtsov & Luba Petersen, 2019. "Central Bank Communication That Works: Lessons from Lab Experiments," Staff Working Papers 19-21, Bank of Canada.
    9. Ryan Rholes & Luba Petersen, 2020. "Should central banks communicate uncertainty in their projections?," Discussion Papers dp20-01, Department of Economics, Simon Fraser University.

  2. Monica Jain, 2018. "Sluggish Forecasts," Staff Working Papers 18-39, Bank of Canada.

    Cited by:

    1. Jakub Rybacki, 2021. "Polish GDP forecast errors: a tale of inefficiency," Bank i Kredyt, Narodowy Bank Polski, vol. 52(2), pages 123-142.

  3. Monica Jain, 2013. "Perceived Inflation Persistence," Staff Working Papers 13-43, Bank of Canada.

    Cited by:

    1. Easaw, Joshy & Heravi, Saeed & Dixon, Huw David, 2015. "Professionals’ Forecast of the Inflation Gap and its Persistence," Cardiff Economics Working Papers E2015/13, Cardiff University, Cardiff Business School, Economics Section.
    2. James M. Nason & Gregor W. Smith, 2013. "Measuring The Slowly Evolving Trend In Us Inflation With Professional Forecasts," Working Paper 1316, Economics Department, Queen's University.
    3. Benjamin Wong, 2015. "Do inflation expectations propagate the inflationary impact of real oil price shocks?: Evidence from the Michigan survey," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Discussion Paper Series DP2015/01, Reserve Bank of New Zealand.
    4. Elmar Mertens & James M. Nason, 2018. "Inflation and professional forecast dynamics: an evaluation of stickiness, persistence, and volatility," BIS Working Papers 713, Bank for International Settlements.
    5. Oinonen, Sami & Paloviita, Maritta, 2016. "How informative are aggregated inflation expectations? Evidence from the ECB Survey of Professional Forecasters," Research Discussion Papers 15/2016, Bank of Finland.
    6. Carlos Carvalho & Stefano Eusepi & Emanuel Moench & Bruce Preston, 2020. "Anchored inflation expectations," CAMA Working Papers 2020-25, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
    7. James M. Nason & Gregor W. Smith, 2013. "Reverse Kalman filtering U.S. inflation with sticky professional forecasts," Working Papers 13-34, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.
    8. Martin Feldkircher & Pierre L. Siklos, 2018. "Global inflation dynamics and inflation expectations," CAMA Working Papers 2018-60, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
    9. Huw Dixon & Joshy Easaw & Saeed Heravi, 2020. "Forecasting inflation gap persistence: Do financial sector professionals differ from nonfinancial sector ones?," International Journal of Finance & Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 25(3), pages 461-474, July.
    10. Monica Jain, 2018. "Sluggish Forecasts," Staff Working Papers 18-39, Bank of Canada.

Articles

  1. Monica Jain & Christopher S. Sutherland, 2020. "How Do Central Bank Projections and Forward Guidance Influence Private-Sector Forecasts?," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 16(5), pages 179-218, October.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Monica Jain, 2019. "Perceived Inflation Persistence," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(1), pages 110-120, January.
    See citations under working paper version above.Sorry, no citations of articles recorded.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

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NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 3 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-MAC: Macroeconomics (3) 2013-12-06 2018-01-22 2018-09-03. Author is listed
  2. NEP-CBA: Central Banking (2) 2013-12-06 2018-01-22. Author is listed
  3. NEP-FOR: Forecasting (2) 2013-12-06 2018-01-22. Author is listed
  4. NEP-MON: Monetary Economics (2) 2013-12-06 2018-01-22. Author is listed

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