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Peter Ekamper

Personal Details

First Name:Peter
Middle Name:
Last Name:Ekamper
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pek14
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
https://nidi.nl/ekamper
NIDI P.O. Box 11650 NL-2502 AR The Hague The Netherlands
++31 70 3565200

Affiliation

Netherlands Interdisciplinary Demographic Institute (NIDI)

Den Haag, Netherlands
http://www.nidi.nl/
RePEc:edi:nidiinl (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Conti, Gabriella & Poupakis, Stavros & Ekamper, Peter & Bijwaard, Govert & Lumey, Lambert H., 2021. "Severe Prenatal Shocks and Adolescent Health: Evidence from the Dutch Hunger Winter," IZA Discussion Papers 14789, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

Articles

  1. Peter Ekamper & Govert E. Bijwaard & Frans W.A. van Poppel & L.H. Lumey, 2020. "War- and famine-related excess mortality among civilians in the Netherlands, 1944–1945," Journal of Maps, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(1), pages 124-131, January.
  2. Peter Ekamper & Govert Bijwaard & Frans van Poppel & L. H. Lumey, 2017. "War-related excess mortality in The Netherlands, 1944–45: New estimates of famine- and non-famine-related deaths from national death records," Historical Methods: A Journal of Quantitative and Interdisciplinary History, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 50(2), pages 113-128, April.
  3. Ekamper, P. & van Poppel, F. & Stein, A.D. & Lumey, L.H., 2014. "Independent and additive association of prenatal famine exposure and intermediary life conditions with adult mortality between age 18–63 years," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 119(C), pages 232-239.
  4. Sebastian Kluesener & Isabelle Devos & Peter Ekamper & Ian Gregory & Siegfried Gruber & Jordi Martí-Henneberg & Frans van Poppel & Luís Espinha da Silveira & Arne Solli, 2014. "Spatial inequalities in infant survival at an early stage of the longevity revolution," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 30(68), pages 1849-1864.
  5. Peter Ekamper & Frans van Poppel & Coen van Duin & Joop Garssen, 2009. "150 Years of temperature-related excess mortality in the Netherlands," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 21(14), pages 385-426.
  6. Joëlle Gaymu & Peter Ekamper & Gijs Beets, 2007. "Qui prendra en charge les Européens âgés dépendants en 2030 ?," Population (french edition), Institut National d'Études Démographiques (INED), vol. 62(4), pages 789-822.
  7. Ewa Tabeau & Peter Ekamper & Corina Huisman & Alinda Bosch, 1999. "Improving Overall Mortality Forecasts by Analysing Cause-of-Death, Period and Cohort Effects in Trends," European Journal of Population, Springer;European Association for Population Studies, vol. 15(2), pages 153-183, June.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Conti, Gabriella & Poupakis, Stavros & Ekamper, Peter & Bijwaard, Govert & Lumey, Lambert H., 2021. "Severe Prenatal Shocks and Adolescent Health: Evidence from the Dutch Hunger Winter," IZA Discussion Papers 14789, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

    Cited by:

    1. Samuel Baker & Pietro Biroli & Hans van Kippersluis & Stephanie von Hinke, 2022. "Beyond Barker: Infant Mortality at Birth and Ischaemic Heart Disease in Older Age," Bristol Economics Discussion Papers 22/765, School of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
    2. Stephanie von Hinke & Emil Sorensen, 2022. "The Long-Term Effects of Early-Life Pollution Exposure: Evidence from the London Smog," Bristol Economics Discussion Papers 22/757, School of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.

Articles

  1. Peter Ekamper & Govert Bijwaard & Frans van Poppel & L. H. Lumey, 2017. "War-related excess mortality in The Netherlands, 1944–45: New estimates of famine- and non-famine-related deaths from national death records," Historical Methods: A Journal of Quantitative and Interdisciplinary History, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 50(2), pages 113-128, April.

    Cited by:

    1. Gabriella Conti & Stavros Poupakis & Peter Ekamper & Govert Bijwaard & L. H. Lumey, 2021. "Severe Prenatal Shocks and Adolescent Health: Evidence from the Dutch Hunger Winter," Working Papers 2021-056, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.

  2. Ekamper, P. & van Poppel, F. & Stein, A.D. & Lumey, L.H., 2014. "Independent and additive association of prenatal famine exposure and intermediary life conditions with adult mortality between age 18–63 years," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 119(C), pages 232-239.

    Cited by:

    1. Maarten J. Bijlsma & Rhian M. Daniel & Fanny Janssen & Bianca L. De Stavola, 2017. "An Assessment and Extension of the Mechanism-Based Approach to the Identification of Age-Period-Cohort Models," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 54(2), pages 721-743, April.
    2. Leonardo Piccione & Gianpiero Dalla-Zuanna & Alessandra Minello, 2014. "Mortality selection in the first three months of life and survival in the following thirty-three months in rural Veneto (North-East Italy) from 1816 to 1835," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 31(39), pages 1199-1228.
    3. Bijwaard, G.E. & Jones, A.M., 2015. "Intelligence and the Mortality Difference by Education: Selection or mediation?," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 15/07, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    4. Mark E. McGovern, 2018. "How Much Does Birth Weight Matter for Child Health in Developing Countries? Estimates from Siblings and Twins," CHaRMS Working Papers 18-04, Centre for HeAlth Research at the Management School (CHaRMS).
    5. Niccodemi, Gianmaria & Bijwaard, Govert, 2018. "Education, Intelligence and Diseases in Old Age," IZA Discussion Papers 11605, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    6. Bijwaard, Govert & Alessie, Rob & Angelini, Viola, 2018. "The Effect of Early Life Health on Later Life Home Care Use: The Mediating Role of Household Composition," IZA Discussion Papers 11729, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    7. Bijwaard, Govert & Jones, Andrew M., 2016. "Cognitive Ability and the Mortality Gradient by Education: Selection or Mediation?," IZA Discussion Papers 9798, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    8. Dell Saulnier & Kim Brolin, 2015. "A systematic review of the health effects of prenatal exposure to disaster," International Journal of Public Health, Springer;Swiss School of Public Health (SSPH+), vol. 60(7), pages 781-787, November.
    9. Govert E. Bijwaard & Andrew M. Jones, 2019. "An IPW estimator for mediation effects in hazard models: with an application to schooling, cognitive ability and mortality," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 57(1), pages 129-175, July.
    10. Haas, Steven A. & Ramirez, Daniel, 2022. "Childhood exposure to war and adult onset of cardiometabolic disorders among older Europeans," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 309(C).

  3. Sebastian Kluesener & Isabelle Devos & Peter Ekamper & Ian Gregory & Siegfried Gruber & Jordi Martí-Henneberg & Frans van Poppel & Luís Espinha da Silveira & Arne Solli, 2014. "Spatial inequalities in infant survival at an early stage of the longevity revolution," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 30(68), pages 1849-1864.

    Cited by:

    1. Sebastian Klüsener & Rembrandt D. Scholz, 2013. "Regional hot spots of exceptional longevity in Germany," Vienna Yearbook of Population Research, Vienna Institute of Demography (VID) of the Austrian Academy of Sciences in Vienna, vol. 11(1), pages 137-163.
    2. Sebastian Klüsener, 2015. "Spatial variation in non-marital fertility across Europe: recent trends, past path dependencies, and potential future pathways," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2015-001, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    3. Mikołaj Szołtysek & Radosław Poniat & Siegfried Gruber & Sebastian Klüsener, 2016. "The Patriarchy Index: a new measure of gender and generational inequalities in the past," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2016-014, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    4. Eva U. B. Kibele & Sebastian Klüsener & Rembrandt D. Scholz, 2014. "Regional mortality disparities in Germany: long-term dynamics and possible determinants," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2014-009, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    5. Hannaliis Jaadla & Alice Reid, 2017. "The geography of early childhood mortality in England and Wales, 1881–1911," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 37(58), pages 1861-1890.

  4. Peter Ekamper & Frans van Poppel & Coen van Duin & Joop Garssen, 2009. "150 Years of temperature-related excess mortality in the Netherlands," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 21(14), pages 385-426.

    Cited by:

    1. Michael Murphy, 2010. "Reexamining the Dominance of Birth Cohort Effects on Mortality," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 36(2), pages 365-390, June.
    2. Stefan Bouzarovski, 2014. "Energy poverty in the European Union: landscapes of vulnerability," Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Energy and Environment, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 3(3), pages 276-289, May.
    3. Tina Ho & Andrew Noymer, 2017. "Summertime, and the livin’ is easy: Winter and summer pseudoseasonal life expectancy in the United States," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 37(45), pages 1445-1476.
    4. W. Walker Hanlon & Casper Worm Hansen & Jake W. Kantor, 2020. "Temperature, Disease, and Death in London: Analyzing Weekly Data for the Century from 1866-1965," NBER Working Papers 27333, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Jae Young Lee, 2022. "A Subgroup Method of Projecting Future Vulnerability and Adaptation to Extreme Heat," Sustainability, MDPI, vol. 14(24), pages 1-9, December.
    6. Francesco Scalone & Alessandra Samoggia, 2018. "Neonatal mortality, cold weather, and socioeconomic status in two northern Italian rural parishes, 1820–1900," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 39(18), pages 525-560.
    7. Saska Petrova & Michael Gentile & Ilkka Henrik Mäkinen & Stefan Bouzarovski, 2013. "Perceptions of Thermal Comfort and Housing Quality: Exploring the Microgeographies of Energy Poverty in Stakhanov, Ukraine," Environment and Planning A, , vol. 45(5), pages 1240-1257, May.
    8. Gianpiero Dalla-Zuanna & Alessandro Rosina, 2011. "An Analysis of Extremely High Nineteenth-Century Winter Neonatal Mortality in a Local Context of Northeastern Italy [Une analyse des niveaux extrêmement élevés de mortalité néonatale hivernale au 1," European Journal of Population, Springer;European Association for Population Studies, vol. 27(1), pages 33-55, February.
    9. Paul L. C. Chua & Chris Fook Sheng Ng & Adovich S. Rivera & Eumelia P. Salva & Miguel Antonio Salazar & Veronika Huber & Masahiro Hashizume, 2021. "Association between Ambient Temperature and Severe Diarrhoea in the National Capital Region, Philippines," IJERPH, MDPI, vol. 18(15), pages 1-10, August.

  5. Joëlle Gaymu & Peter Ekamper & Gijs Beets, 2007. "Qui prendra en charge les Européens âgés dépendants en 2030 ?," Population (french edition), Institut National d'Études Démographiques (INED), vol. 62(4), pages 789-822.

    Cited by:

    1. Viola Angelini & Anne Laferrère, 2010. "Residential Mobility of the European Elderly," CESifo Working Paper Series 3280, CESifo.
    2. Fernando Gil Alonso, 2009. "Can the rising pension burden in Europe be mitigated by immigration? Modelling the effects of selected demographic and socio-economic factors on ageing in the European Union, 2008-2050," Vienna Yearbook of Population Research, Vienna Institute of Demography (VID) of the Austrian Academy of Sciences in Vienna, vol. 7(1), pages 123-147.

  6. Ewa Tabeau & Peter Ekamper & Corina Huisman & Alinda Bosch, 1999. "Improving Overall Mortality Forecasts by Analysing Cause-of-Death, Period and Cohort Effects in Trends," European Journal of Population, Springer;European Association for Population Studies, vol. 15(2), pages 153-183, June.

    Cited by:

    1. Nhan Huynh & Mike Ludkovski, 2021. "Joint Models for Cause-of-Death Mortality in Multiple Populations," Papers 2111.06631, arXiv.org.
    2. Li, Han & Li, Hong & Lu, Yang & Panagiotelis, Anastasios, 2019. "A forecast reconciliation approach to cause-of-death mortality modeling," Insurance: Mathematics and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 86(C), pages 122-133.
    3. Nicholas Bett & Juma Kasozi & Daniel Ruturwa, 2022. "Temporal Clustering of the Causes of Death for Mortality Modelling," Risks, MDPI, vol. 10(5), pages 1-34, May.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 1 paper announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-HEA: Health Economics (1) 2021-11-29
  2. NEP-HIS: Business, Economic & Financial History (1) 2021-11-29
  3. NEP-URE: Urban & Real Estate Economics (1) 2021-11-29

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