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Energy Policies and Multitopic Household Surveys : Guidelines for Questionnaire Design in Living Standards Measurement Studies

Author

Listed:
  • Kyran O'Sullivan
  • Douglas F. Barnes

Abstract

Analysis using data on household energy use from Living Standards Measurement Study (LSMS) surveys can help policymakers to identify which households are affected by energy poverty and then design policies that will accelerate the household energy transition. This paper shows that LSMS can provide accurate data on household energy use, combined with other data on household wellbeing (including consumption, income, health, and education), to monitor the progress in the household energy transition from traditional biomass fuels to modern fuels and electricity and to evaluate the effect of government energy policies on living conditions.

Suggested Citation

  • Kyran O'Sullivan & Douglas F. Barnes, 2007. "Energy Policies and Multitopic Household Surveys : Guidelines for Questionnaire Design in Living Standards Measurement Studies," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 6615.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbpubs:6615
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    File URL: https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/bitstream/handle/10986/6615/380610Energy0surveys01OFFICIAL0USE0ONLY1.pdf?sequence=1
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Barnes, Douglas F, et al, 1993. "The Design and Diffusion of Improved Cooking Stoves," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 8(2), pages 119-141, July.
    2. Whittington, Dale, 1998. "Administering contingent valuation surveys in developing countries," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 26(1), pages 21-30, January.
    3. Grosh, M.E. & Munoz, J., 1996. "A Manual for Planning and Implementing the Living Standards Measurement Study Survey," Papers 126, World Bank - Living Standards Measurement.
    4. Hosier, R. H. & Kipondya, W., 1993. "Urban household energy use in Tanzania : Prices, substitutes and poverty," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 21(5), pages 454-473, May.
    5. Khandker, S.R., 1996. "Education Achievements and School Efficiency in Rural Bangladesh," World Bank - Discussion Papers 319, World Bank.
    6. Margaret Grosh & Paul Glewwe, 2000. "Designing Household Survey Questionnaires for Developing Countries : Lessons from 15 Years of the Living Standards Measurement Study, Volume 2," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 15194.
    7. Kulsum Ahmed & Yewande Awe & Douglas F. Barnes & Maureen L. Cropper & Masami Kojima, 2005. "Environmental Health and Traditional Fuel Use in Guatemala," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 7340, January.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Malla, Sunil, 2013. "Household energy consumption patterns and its environmental implications: Assessment of energy access and poverty in Nepal," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 990-1002.
    2. Gudina Terefe Tucho & Sanderine Nonhebel, 2015. "Bio-Wastes as an Alternative Household Cooking Energy Source in Ethiopia," Energies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 8(9), pages 1-19, September.
    3. repec:eee:enepol:v:108:y:2017:i:c:p:102-110 is not listed on IDEAS

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