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Property markets and financial stability

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  • Bank for International Settlements

Abstract

The Bank for International Settlements (BIS) and the Monetary Authority of Singapore (MAS) jointly organised a workshop on property markets and financial stability in Singapore on 5 September 2011. The workshop aimed to bring together academics and researchers at central banks, regulatory agencies and international organisations to present and discuss ongoing theoretical and empirical work in the field. In response to their call for papers, the organisers received 67 submissions from central banks, public agencies, international organisations and academic institutions. From these, a paper selection committee comprising staff of the BIS, the MAS and academia chose seven papers organised around the following four themes: (1) lessons from the crisis; (2) house price assessment; (3) housing booms and busts; and (4) property, credit and markets. All in all, 39 participants took part, including central bank economists as well as academics from Asia and the Pacific, Europe and the United States. Assistant Managing Director Andrew Khoo of the MAS and Frank Packer, Head of Financial Stability and Markets for Asia and the Pacific of the BIS, delivered the opening remarks. Professor Timothy Riddiough at the University of Wisconsin gave a keynote speech. This volume is a collection of the opening remarks, the keynote speech, revised versions of all the papers presented during the workshop, as well as discussant remarks on these papers.

Individual chapters are listed in the "Chapters" tab

Suggested Citation

  • Bank for International Settlements, 2012. "Property markets and financial stability," BIS Papers, Bank for International Settlements, number 64, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:bis:bisbps:64
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Luci Ellis, 2006. "Housing and Housing Finance: The View from Australia and Beyond," RBA Research Discussion Papers rdp2006-12, Reserve Bank of Australia.
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    1. Richard Keely & Ronan C. Lyons, 2022. "Housing Prices, Yields and Credit Conditions in Dublin since 1945," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 64(3), pages 404-439, April.
    2. Ronan C. Lyons, 2013. "Inside a Bubble and Crash – Evidence from the Valuation of Amenities," Chapters in SUERF Studies, SUERF - The European Money and Finance Forum.
    3. Lyons, Ronan C., 2019. "Can list prices accurately capture housing price trends? Insights from extreme markets conditions," Finance Research Letters, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 228-232.
    4. Leonardo Gambacorta & Andrés Murcia, 2019. "The impact of macroprudential policies and their interaction with monetary policy: an empirical analysis using credit registry data," IFC Bulletins chapters, in: Bank for International Settlements (ed.), Are post-crisis statistical initiatives completed?, volume 49, Bank for International Settlements.
    5. Hyland, Marie & Lyons, Ronan C. & Lyons, Seán, 2013. "The value of domestic building energy efficiency — evidence from Ireland," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 943-952.
    6. Alexandra Heath & Frank Packer & Callan Windsor, 2012. "Introduction to Property Markets and Financial Stability," RBA Annual Conference Volume (Discontinued), in: Alexandra Heath & Frank Packer & Callan Windsor (ed.),Property Markets and Financial Stability, Reserve Bank of Australia.
    7. Marcelo Cajias, 2017. "Is there room for another hedonic model? –The advantages of the GAMLSS approach in real estate research," ERES eres2017_226, European Real Estate Society (ERES).
    8. repec:tcd:tcduee:tep051 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Gambacorta, Leonardo & Murcia, Andrés, 2020. "The impact of macroprudential policies in Latin America: An empirical analysis using credit registry data," Journal of Financial Intermediation, Elsevier, vol. 42(C).
    10. Zia Abbas & Syed Faizan Iftikhar & Shaista Alam, 2019. "Does bank capital affect the monetary policy transmission mechanism? A case study of Emerging Market Economies (EMEs)," International Journal of Financial Engineering (IJFE), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 6(02), pages 1-20, June.
    11. Massimo Cecchini & Ilaria Zambon & Luca Salvati, 2019. "Housing and the City: A Spatial Analysis of Residential Building Activity and the Socio-Demographic Background in a Mediterranean City, 1990–2017," Sustainability, MDPI, vol. 11(2), pages 1-23, January.
    12. Ronan C Lyons, 2017. "Credit conditions and the housing price ratio: evidence from Ireland's bubble and crash," Trinity Economics Papers tep0717, Trinity College Dublin, Department of Economics.
    13. Ronan C. Lyons & Sean Lyons & Sarah Stanley, 2015. "The Price Effect of Building Energy Ratings in the Dublin Residential Market," Trinity Economics Papers tep0415, Trinity College Dublin, Department of Economics.
    14. John Muellbauer, 2015. "Housing and the Macroeconomy: Inflation and the Financial Accelerator," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 47(S1), pages 51-58, March.
    15. Stanley Fischer, 2017. "Housing and Financial Stability : a speech at the DNB-Riksbank Macroprudential Conference Series, Amsterdam, Netherlands, June 20, 2017," Speech 956, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    16. Muellbauer, John, 2018. "The Future of Macroeconomics," INET Oxford Working Papers 2018-10, Institute for New Economic Thinking at the Oxford Martin School, University of Oxford.

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