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The Impacts of Hookworm Eradication in the American South. A replication study of Bleakley (The Quarterly Journal of Economics, 2007)*

* This paper is a replication of an original study

Author

Listed:
  • Roodman, David

Abstract

Through designs akin to difference-in-differences, Bleakley (2007) produces evidence that the campaign to eradicate hookworm from the American South circa 1910 boosted school enrollment in childhood and income in adulthood. This comment works to replicate and reanalyze that study. Innovations include incorporation of the larger U.S. Census samples now available, and fitting of specifications focusing more sharply on the timing of any effects of the campaign, which are the basis of the most credible identification. The long-term convergence between historically low- and high-hookworm areas documented in Bleakley (2007) began decades before the campaign and did not accelerate in a way that would invite hookworm eradication as an explanation. Likewise, in the case of adult income, the convergence continued for decades after. In sum, hookworm eradication did not leave a telltale imprint on the historical record assembled here.

Suggested Citation

  • Roodman, David, 2018. "The Impacts of Hookworm Eradication in the American South. A replication study of Bleakley (The Quarterly Journal of Economics, 2007)," International Journal for Re-Views in Empirical Economics (IREE), ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, vol. 2(2018-3), pages 1-45.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:ireejl:190496
    DOI: 10.18718/81781.7
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Croke,Kevin & Hicks,Joan Hamory & Hsu,Eric & Kremer,Michael Robert & Miguel,Edward A., 2016. "Does mass deworming affect child nutrition ? meta-analysis, cost-effectiveness, and statistical power," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7921, The World Bank.
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    4. Edward Miguel & Michael Kremer, 2004. "Worms: Identifying Impacts on Education and Health in the Presence of Treatment Externalities," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 72(1), pages 159-217, January.
    5. Michael Spence & Maureen Lewis, 2009. "Health and Growth : Commission on Growth and Development," World Bank Publications - Books, The World Bank Group, number 2633, December.
    6. Hoyt Bleakley, 2007. "Disease and Development: Evidence from Hookworm Eradication in the American South," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 122(1), pages 73-117.
    7. Kevin Croke & Joan Hamory Hicks & Eric Hsu & Michael Kremer & Ricardo Maertens & Edward Miguel & Witold Więcek, 2016. "Meta-Analysis and Public Policy: Reconciling the Evidence on Deworming," NBER Working Papers 22382, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Hoyt Bleakley, 2010. "Malaria Eradication in the Americas: A Retrospective Analysis of Childhood Exposure," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 2(2), pages 1-45, April.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    Cited by:

    1. Roodman, David, 2018. "Malaria eradication in the Americas: A replication study of Bleakley (American Economic Journal. Applied Economics, 2010)," International Journal for Re-Views in Empirical Economics (IREE), ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, vol. 2(2018-4), pages 1-35.

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    Replication

    This item is a replication of:
  • Hoyt Bleakley, 2007. "Disease and Development: Evidence from Hookworm Eradication in the American South," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 122(1), pages 73-117.
  • More about this item

    Keywords

    worms; public health and economic development; replication study;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration

    Lists

    This item is featured on the following reading lists, Wikipedia, or ReplicationWiki pages:
    1. The Impacts of Hookworm Eradication in the American South. A replication study of Bleakley (The Quarterly Journal of Economics, 2007) (Int J Re-Views in Emp Econ 2018) in ReplicationWiki

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