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Does SEE information make a difference to fund managers?


  • Johan Henningsson

    (School of Business, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden)


The purpose of this paper is to explore how fund mangers, as cultured observers, make sense of social, environmental and ethical (SEE) information about companies. The paper uses a qualitative research approach involving in depth interviews with fund managers in Sweden. The analysis is influenced by a combination of system and network theories where social networks are imposed on fund managers when they make sense of corporate information. With reference to a growing SRI market, the rationales of social forces imposed on fund managers do not seem to have changed in order for them to include social aspects. Instead, these aspects are taken care of elsewhere in organizations, leaving fund managers as nodes in social networks, outside. However, if social aspects become an issue for the market positioning of companies, they could probably make more of a difference to the rationales of social forces surrounding fund managers. Copyright © 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and ERP Environment.

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  • Johan Henningsson, 2008. "Does SEE information make a difference to fund managers?," Sustainable Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 16(3), pages 169-179.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:sustdv:v:16:y:2008:i:3:p:169-179 DOI: 10.1002/sd.362

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. N. Kreander & R.H. Gray & D.M. Power & C.D. Sinclair, 2005. "Evaluating the Performance of Ethical and Non-ethical Funds: A Matched Pair Analysis," Journal of Business Finance & Accounting, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 32(7-8), pages 1465-1493.
    2. Jensen, Michael C. & Meckling, William H., 1976. "Theory of the firm: Managerial behavior, agency costs and ownership structure," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 3(4), pages 305-360, October.
    3. Myers, Stewart C., 1977. "Determinants of corporate borrowing," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 5(2), pages 147-175, November.
    4. Robert Webb & Matthias Beck & Roddy McKinnon, 2003. "Problems and Limitations of Institutional Investor Participation in Corporate Governance," Corporate Governance: An International Review, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 11(1), pages 65-73, January.
    5. Karen Benson & Timothy Brailsford & Jacquelyn Humphrey, 2006. "Do Socially Responsible Fund Managers Really Invest Differently?," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 65(4), pages 337-357, June.
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