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Applying evolutionary psychology in understanding the Darwinian roots of consumption phenomena

  • Gad Saad

    (John Molson School of Business, Concordia University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada)

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    Consumer scholars have amassed an impressive body of knowledge using a wide range of methodological approaches and paradigms. Despite the scientific rigor of the consumer behavior discipline, most scholars that have reviewed the field agree that it has yielded a fragmented and confused literature. It is argued here that this is in part due to the near paucity of evolutionary-based theorizing within the theoretical frameworks used by consumer scholars. While evolutionary psychology focuses on ultimate causation namely the adaptive origins of a particular cognition, emotion, preference, or behavior, the consumer behavior discipline has overwhelmingly addressed proximate mechanisms. Both levels of analyses are needed for a full understanding of consumption phenomena. Copyright © 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1002/mde.1292
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    Article provided by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. in its journal Managerial and Decision Economics.

    Volume (Year): 27 (2006)
    Issue (Month): 2-3 ()
    Pages: 189-201

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    Handle: RePEc:wly:mgtdec:v:27:y:2006:i:2-3:p:189-201
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/7976

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    1. Meyers-Levy, Joan & Maheswaran, Durairaj, 1991. " Exploring Differences in Males' and Females' Processing Strategies," Journal of Consumer Research, University of Chicago Press, vol. 18(1), pages 63-70, June.
    2. Satoshi Kanazawa, 2004. "The Savanna Principle," Managerial and Decision Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 25(1), pages 41-54.
    3. Turley, L. W. & Milliman, Ronald E., 2000. "Atmospheric Effects on Shopping Behavior: A Review of the Experimental Evidence," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 49(2), pages 193-211, August.
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