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The political economy of gambling regulation

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  • Raymond D. Sauer

    (Clemson University, Clemson, SC, USA)

Abstract

This paper presents an interest group model of gambling regulation and applies it to major changes in the regulation of US gambling markets. Gambling markets are among the most restricted and politicized markets in the American economy, yet economists interested in the economics of regulation have paid them little attention. Applying the economic theory of regulation to gambling markets can lead to greater understanding of current public policy. In addition, this application may shed light on the discipline itself, as to its ability to explain recurrent fluctuations in the extent of regulatory intervention over long periods of time. Broadly speaking, the interest group model is consistent with changes in the extent of regulation, including the recent period of liberalization and consequent growth in gambling. Copyright © 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • Raymond D. Sauer, 2001. "The political economy of gambling regulation," Managerial and Decision Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 22(1-3), pages 5-15.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:mgtdec:v:22:y:2001:i:1-3:p:5-15
    DOI: 10.1002/mde.996
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    1. repec:ces:ifodic:v:12:y:2014:i:3:p:19126467 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Aidan Vining & Anthony Boardman, 2014. "Self-interest Springs Eternal: Political Economy Reasons why Public-Private Partnerships Do Not Work as Well as Expected," ifo DICE Report, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 12(3), pages 17-23, October.
    3. Chang, Juin-Jen & Fiedler, Ingo & Lai, Ching-Chong & Wang, Ping, 2021. "Cross-border casino competition, Externalities and Optimal Tax Policy: A Unified Theory with Quantitative Analysis," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(C).
    4. Juin-Jen Chang & Ching-Chong Lai & Ping Wang, 2004. "On the Public Economics of Casino Gambling," IEAS Working Paper : academic research 04-A005, Institute of Economics, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan.
    5. Aidan Vining & Anthony Boardman, 2014. "Self-interest Springs Eternal: Political Economy Reasons why Public-Private Partnerships Do Not Work as Well as Expected," ifo DICE Report, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 12(03), pages 17-23, October.
    6. Humphreys, Brad R. & Soebbing, Brian, 2012. "Sports betting, sports bettors and sports gambling policy," Edition HWWI: Chapters, in: Büch, Martin-Peter & Maennig, Wolfgang & Schulke, Hans-Jürgen (ed.), Sport und Sportgroßveranstaltungen in Europa - zwischen Zentralstaat und Regionen, volume 4, pages 15-37, Hamburg Institute of International Economics (HWWI).
    7. Levi Perez, 2018. "Introduction - Gambling economics and management: some insights into recent developments in gambling-related research," Economics and Business Letters, Oviedo University Press, vol. 7(4), pages 126-128.
    8. Juin‐Jen Chang & Ching‐Chong Lai & Ping Wang, 2010. "Casino regulations and economic welfare," Canadian Journal of Economics/Revue canadienne d'économique, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 43(3), pages 1058-1085, August.
    9. David Paton & Donald S. Siegel & Leighton Vaughan Williams, 2002. "A Policy Response To The E--Commerce Revolution: The Case Of Betting Taxation In The UK," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 112(480), pages 296-314, June.
    10. Humphreys, Brad R. & Perez, Levi, 2012. "Who Bets on Sports? Characteristics of Sports Bettors and the Consequences of Expanding Sports Betting Opportunities/¿Quién apuesta? Características de los apostantes deportivos y consecuencias de la ," Estudios de Economia Aplicada, Estudios de Economia Aplicada, vol. 30, pages 579-598, Agosto.
    11. Juin-Jen Chang & Ching-Chong Lai & Ping Wang, 2017. "A Tale of Two Cities: Cross-Border Casino Competition Between Detroit and Windsor," NBER Working Papers 23969, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    12. David Forrest, 2013. "An Economic And Social Review Of Gambling In Great Britain," Journal of Gambling Business and Economics, University of Buckingham Press, vol. 7(3), pages 1-33.

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