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Does government funding alter nonprofit governance? Evidence from New York City nonprofit contractors

Author

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  • Katherine O'Regan

    (Wagner Graduate School of Public Service, New York University)

  • Sharon Oster

    (School of Management, Yale University)

Abstract

Government contracting has raised a collection of issues with respect to adequate oversight and accountability. This paper explores one avenue through which contracting agencies may achieve these tasks: through the governance practices of the contractor's board. Oversight and monitoring are a board's key responsibilities, and influencing a board's practices is one way a governmental agency can help to insure quality performance. Agencies could thus use both their selection process and their post-contracting power to influence board practice. Using a new, rich data set on the nonprofit contractors of New York City, a series of hypotheses were tested on the relationship between government funding and board practices. Significant differences were found to exist in board practices as a function of government funding levels, differences that mark a shift of energy away from some activities (i.e., traditional board functions, such as fund-raising) towards others (financial monitoring and advocacy). This suggests that government agencies may indeed use their contracting choices with an eye to particular governance practices. This increased emphasis on such activities appears to crowd out other activities, and is not unambiguously to the benefit of nonprofit board governance. © 2002 by the Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management.

Suggested Citation

  • Katherine O'Regan & Sharon Oster, 2002. "Does government funding alter nonprofit governance? Evidence from New York City nonprofit contractors," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 21(3), pages 359-379.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:jpamgt:v:21:y:2002:i:3:p:359-379
    DOI: 10.1002/pam.10050
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1002/pam.10050
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Khanna, Jyoti & Sandler, Todd, 2000. "Partners in giving:: The crowding-in effects of UK government grants," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 44(8), pages 1543-1556, August.
    2. Steinberg, Richard S, 1987. "Voluntary Donations and Public Expenditures in a Federal System," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 77(1), pages 24-36, March.
    3. Fama, Eugene F & Jensen, Michael C, 1983. "Separation of Ownership and Control," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 26(2), pages 301-325, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Wellens, Lore & Jegers, Marc, 2014. "Effective governance in nonprofit organizations: A literature based multiple stakeholder approach," European Management Journal, Elsevier, vol. 32(2), pages 223-243.
    2. Newton, Ashley N., 2015. "Executive compensation, organizational performance, and governance quality in the absence of owners," Journal of Corporate Finance, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 195-222.
    3. Ashley Shena, 2014. "The Impact of Government Funding on Competition in the Nonprofit Sector: An Integrative Model and Review of Empirical Research," Nonprofit Policy Forum, De Gruyter, vol. 5(2), pages 1-17, October.
    4. Gmür, Markus, 2013. "Finanzierungsmix und Effizienz in spendensammelnden Organisationen," FSES Working Papers 440, Faculty of Economics and Social Sciences, University of Freiburg/Fribourg Switzerland.
    5. Murphy Haley & Robichau Robbie Waters, 2016. "Governmental Influences on Organizational Capacity: The Case of Child Welfare Nonprofits," Nonprofit Policy Forum, De Gruyter, vol. 7(3), pages 339-367, September.
    6. Dewaelheyns, Nico & Eeckloo, Kristof & Van Herck, Gustaaf & Van Hulle, Cynthia & Vleugels, Arthur, 2009. "Do non-profit nursing homes separate governance roles?: The impact of size and ownership characteristics," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 90(2-3), pages 188-195, May.
    7. Obonyo Mark Ouche & David Odhiambo Oima & Moses Oginda, 2016. "Effect of Strategic Planning on Annual Income of National Sports Federations in Kenya," International Journal of Academic Research in Business and Social Sciences, Human Resource Management Academic Research Society, International Journal of Academic Research in Business and Social Sciences, vol. 6(5), pages 41-64, May.

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