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Econometric issues in testing the age neutrality of health care expenditure

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  • Christian Salas
  • James P. Raftery

Abstract

A recent study by Zweifel et al. (Zweifel P, Felder S, Meiers M. Ageing of the population and health care expenditure: a red herring? Health Economics 1999; 8: 485–496) suggests that age is not related to health care expenditure among the elderly once ‘closeness to death’ is controlled for. If correct, this finding has major policy implications, but flaws in the econometric analysis undermine its credibility. We highlight two in particular, and propose methods to deal with them. Copyright © 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • Christian Salas & James P. Raftery, 2001. "Econometric issues in testing the age neutrality of health care expenditure," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 10(7), pages 669-671, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:10:y:2001:i:7:p:669-671
    DOI: 10.1002/hec.638
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    1. Delgado, Miguel A & Robinson, Peter M, 1992. "Nonparametric and Semiparametric Methods for Economic Research," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 6(3), pages 201-249.
    2. Peter Zweifel & Stefan Felder & Markus Meiers, 1999. "Ageing of population and health care expenditure: a red herring?," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 8(6), pages 485-496, September.
    3. Alan M. Garber & Thomas E. MaCurdy & Mark C. McClellan, 1998. "Medical Care at the End of Life: Diseases, Treatment Patterns, and Costs," NBER Working Papers 6748, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Andrew M. Jones, 2012. "health econometrics," The New Palgrave Dictionary of Economics,, Palgrave Macmillan.
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