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Analyzing the Reductions in U.S. Air Pollution Emissions: 1970 to 1990

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  • Thomas M. Selden
  • Anne S. Forrest
  • James E. Lockhart

Abstract

Findings of inverted-U relationships between income and certain pollutants have generated considerable controversy, yet relatively little is known about the factors underlying these relationships. U. S. emissions of several major air pollutants have begun to decline, mirroring trajectories found using data across countries and time. We examine U. S. emissions of six air pollutants between 1970 and 1990, decomposing the changes into scale, composition, energy intensity, energy mix, and other technique effects. Our results provide a case study of the relative importance of these effects for a country on the downward- sloping portions of its emissions-GDP trajectories for the pollutants examined.

Suggested Citation

  • Thomas M. Selden & Anne S. Forrest & James E. Lockhart, 1999. "Analyzing the Reductions in U.S. Air Pollution Emissions: 1970 to 1990," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 75(1), pages 1-21.
  • Handle: RePEc:uwp:landec:v:75:y:1999:i:1:p:1-21
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    Cited by:

    1. Cavlovic, Therese A. & Baker, Kenneth H. & Berrens, Robert P. & Gawande, Kishore, 2000. "A Meta-Analysis of Environmental Kuznets Curve Studies," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 29(01), pages 32-42, April.
    2. Fujii, Hidemichi & Managi, Shunsuke, 2013. "Which industry is greener? An empirical study of nine industries in OECD countries," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 381-388.
    3. Hettige, Hemamala & Mani, Muthukumara & Wheeler, David, 2000. "Industrial pollution in economic development: the environmental Kuznets curve revisited," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 62(2), pages 445-476, August.
    4. Pasurka, Carl Jr., 2006. "Decomposing electric power plant emissions within a joint production framework," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 26-43, January.
    5. Cherniwchan, Jevan, 2012. "Economic growth, industrialization, and the environment," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(4), pages 442-467.
    6. Arik Levinson, 2009. "Technology, International Trade, and Pollution from US Manufacturing," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 99(5), pages 2177-2192, December.
    7. Gawande, Kishore & Berrens, Robert P. & Bohara, Alok K., 2001. "A consumption-based theory of the environmental Kuznets curve," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 101-112, April.
    8. Binder, Seth & Neumayer, Eric, 2005. "Environmental pressure group strength and air pollution: An empirical analysis," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 55(4), pages 527-538, December.
    9. Tao, Zhining & Hewings, Geoffrey & Donaghy, Kieran, 2010. "An economic analysis of Midwestern US criteria pollutant emissions trends from 1970 to 2000," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 69(8), pages 1666-1674, June.
    10. Stern, David I., 2004. "The Rise and Fall of the Environmental Kuznets Curve," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 32(8), pages 1419-1439, August.
    11. Stern, David I., 2002. "Explaining changes in global sulfur emissions: an econometric decomposition approach," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(1-2), pages 201-220, August.
    12. Bruvoll, Annegrete & Larsen, Bodil Merethe, 2004. "Greenhouse gas emissions in Norway: do carbon taxes work?," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 32(4), pages 493-505, March.
    13. He, Jie, 2010. "What is the role of openness for China's aggregate industrial SO2 emission?: A structural analysis based on the Divisia decomposition method," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 69(4), pages 868-886, February.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • Q25 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - Water

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