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The Noncognitive Determinants of Labor Market and Behavioral Outcomes: Introduction to the Symposium

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  • Bas ter Weel

Abstract

Introduction to the Symposium. The symposium consists of seven contributions to understanding the noncognitive determinants of labor market and behavioral outcomes. These contributions are now briefly introduced.

Suggested Citation

  • Bas ter Weel, 2008. "The Noncognitive Determinants of Labor Market and Behavioral Outcomes: Introduction to the Symposium," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 43(4).
  • Handle: RePEc:uwp:jhriss:v:43:y:2008:i4:p729-737
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Alan B. Krueger & David Schkade, 2008. "Sorting in the Labor Market: Do Gregarious Workers Flock to Interactive Jobs?," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 43(4).
    2. Nicole M. Fortin, 2008. "The Gender Wage Gap among Young Adults in the United States: The Importance of Money versus People," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 43(4).
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Cornelius A. Rietveld & Jolanda Hessels & Peter van der Zwan, 2014. "The Stature of the Self-employed and its Premium," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 14-109/VII, Tinbergen Institute.
    2. Helena Holmlund & Olmo Silva, 2014. "Targeting Noncognitive Skills to Improve Cognitive Outcomes: Evidence from a Remedial Education Intervention," Journal of Human Capital, University of Chicago Press, vol. 8(2), pages 126-160.
    3. Sinem H. Ayhan & Kseniia Gatskova & Hartmut Lehmann, 2017. "The impact of non-cognitive skills and risk preferences on rural-to-urban migration: Evidence from Ukraine," Working Papers 369, Leibniz Institut für Ost- und Südosteuropaforschung (Institute for East and Southeast European Studies).
    4. Soo Hong Chew & Junjian Yi & Junsen Zhang & Songfa Zhong, 2016. "Education and anomalies in decision making: Experimental evidence from Chinese adult twins," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 53(2), pages 163-200, December.
    5. Robert Kaestner & Kevin Callison, 2011. "Adolescent Cognitive and Noncognitive Correlates of Adult Health," Journal of Human Capital, University of Chicago Press, vol. 5(1), pages 29-69.
    6. Gerdes, Christer & Gränsmark, Patrik, 2010. "Strategic behavior across gender: A comparison of female and male expert chess players," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(5), pages 766-775, October.
    7. Tiiu Paas & Maryna Tverdostup, 2016. "Assessment of labour market returns in the case of gender unique human capital," ERSA conference papers ersa16p157, European Regional Science Association.
    8. Cecilia Albert & José García Clavel, 2014. "Análisis de las diferentes dimensiones de las competencias en el trabajo," Investigaciones de Economía de la Educación volume 9,in: Adela García Aracil & Isabel Neira Gómez (ed.), Investigaciones de Economía de la Educación 9, edition 1, volume 9, chapter 38, pages 731-745 Asociación de Economía de la Educación.
    9. Guerra, Nancy & Modecki, Kathryn & Cunningham, Wendy, 2014. "Developing social-emotional skills for the labor market : the PRACTICE model," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7123, The World Bank.
    10. Wayne A. Grove & Andrew Hussey & Michael Jetter, 2011. "The Gender Pay Gap Beyond Human Capital: Heterogeneity in Noncognitive Skills and in Labor Market Tastes," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 46(4), pages 827-874.

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