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Dynamics in human development: partial mobility and “jump”

Author

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  • Atanu Sengupta

    () (Associate Professor, Department of Economics, Burdwan University, Burdwan, West Bengal, India)

  • Abhijit Ghosh

    () (Assistant Professor of Economics, Division of Economics, A N Sinha Institute of Social Studies, Patna, Bihar, India)

Abstract

Development economists have argued that interesting dynamics exist in the intergroup movement of countries in terms of several development parameters. However, standard mobility measures are aggregative in nature. They do not study intergroup variation in mobility. In an earlier paper, we have introduced the concept of partial mobility for analysing the movement of a particular group. In this paper, the degree to which the group has progressed (or declined) from its current position is measured. It is argued that any movement is not sufficient to enhance (or worsen) a group’s welfare. There is a perceived threshold, and any movement above that threshold may be defined as “jump”. The focus of this paper is jumps, not just mobility. Jump is characterized with a set of axioms. The analysis of global data reveals that the poor countries fail to cross a threshold level, although there may be some limited movement within a narrow limit.

Suggested Citation

  • Atanu Sengupta & Abhijit Ghosh, 2013. "Dynamics in human development: partial mobility and “jump”," Asia-Pacific Development Journal, United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP), vol. 20(1), pages 33-62, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:unt:jnapdj:v:20:y:2013:i:1:p:33-62
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Quah, Danny, 1993. "Empirical cross-section dynamics in economic growth," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 37(2-3), pages 426-434, April.
    2. Bob Baulch & John Hoddinott, 2000. "Economic mobility and poverty dynamics in developing countries," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(6), pages 1-24.
    3. Atanu Sengupta & Abhijit Ghosh, 2010. "Negative and Positive Partial Mobility: A Study of the Relative Changes in Human Development," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 99(2), pages 249-268, November.
    4. Gang, Ira N. & Landon-Lane, John & Yun, Myeong-Su, 2002. "Gender Differences in German Upward Income Mobility," IZA Discussion Papers 580, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Thomas Demuynck & Dirk Van de gaer, 2012. "Inequality Adjusted Income Growth," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 79(316), pages 747-765, October.
    6. Shorrocks, A F, 1976. "Income Mobility and the Markov Assumption," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 86(343), pages 566-578, September.
    7. Basu, Kaushik, 1994. "The Traveler's Dilemma: Paradoxes of Rationality in Game Theory," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(2), pages 391-395, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Enrico Casadio Tarabusi & Giulio Guarini, 2016. "Level Dependence of the Adjustment for Unbalance and Inequality for the Human Development Index," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 126(2), pages 527-553, March.
    2. Bienvenido Ortega & Antonio Casquero & Jesús Sanjuán, 2016. "Corruption and Convergence in Human Development: Evidence from 69 Countries During 1990–2012," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 127(2), pages 691-719, June.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Human development; mobility indices; welfare implications;

    JEL classification:

    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products
    • O40 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - General
    • O16 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Financial Markets; Saving and Capital Investment; Corporate Finance and Governance
    • I31 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General Welfare, Well-Being

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