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Balancing private sector development and local-central relations

Author

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  • Edo Andriesse

    () (International College, Khon Kaen University, Thailand)

Abstract

Although academics, civil servants and non-governmental organizations involved in development have continued to promote policies for local economies, many localities fail to catch up with average national development patterns. The body of knowledge on this topic has been split into two parts: private sector development (PSD) and local-central relations (LCR). This article argues that, in order for policies to be effective, PSD and LCR should be analysed simultaneously. Drawing on evidence from empirical work conducted in South-East Asia, the article offers policymakers some ways forward. Important features to be reckoned with are the sequencing of policies, the problem of historically rooted disabling institutions, the benefits of local enabling institutions, ethnic tensions and structural opposition from central Governments.

Suggested Citation

  • Edo Andriesse, 2009. "Balancing private sector development and local-central relations," Asia-Pacific Development Journal, United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP), vol. 16(1), pages 93-114, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:unt:jnapdj:v:16:y:2009:i:1:p:93-114
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    File URL: http://www.unescap.org/sites/default/files/apdj-16-1-4-Andriesse.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. DeanS. Karlan, 2007. "Social connections and group banking," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 117(517), pages 52-84, February.
    2. Marthen L. Ndoen & Cees Gorter & Peter Nijkamp & Piet Rietveld, 2000. "Migrants Entrepreneurs in East Nusa Tenggara," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 00-081/3, Tinbergen Institute.
    3. Ronald U. Mendoza & Nina Thelen, 2008. "Innovations to Make Markets More Inclusive for the Poor," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 26(4), pages 427-458, July.
    4. Mutebi, 2004. "Recentralising while Decentralising: Centre-Local Relations and "CEO" Governors in Thailand," Asia Pacific Journal of Public Administration, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 26(1), pages 33-53, June.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Southeast Asia; Private sector development; Local-central relations; periphery; informal institutions; disabling institutions; ethnic-religious tensions;

    JEL classification:

    • B52 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - Current Heterodox Approaches - - - Historical; Institutional; Evolutionary
    • H75 - Public Economics - - State and Local Government; Intergovernmental Relations - - - State and Local Government: Health, Education, and Welfare
    • H77 - Public Economics - - State and Local Government; Intergovernmental Relations - - - Intergovernmental Relations; Federalism
    • I30 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General
    • O18 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Urban, Rural, Regional, and Transportation Analysis; Housing; Infrastructure
    • R11 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Regional Economic Activity: Growth, Development, Environmental Issues, and Changes
    • R12 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Size and Spatial Distributions of Regional Economic Activity; Interregional Trade (economic geography)
    • R58 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Regional Government Analysis - - - Regional Development Planning and Policy
    • Z13 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - Economic Sociology; Economic Anthropology; Language; Social and Economic Stratification

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