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Simple Analytics of Productive Consumption

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  • Suen, Wing
  • Mo, Pak Hung

Abstract

The shadow price of a productive good is equal to its money price less its marginal product. As more of the good is consumed, its shadow price rises because of diminishing productivity and the consumer's full income also rises because the marginal product is positive. The direction of the overall bias induced by endogenous prices and income is found to be determinate. The authors demonstrate that the demand for productive goods tends to be relatively unresponsive to exogenous changes in prices and income. Similarly, labor supply will be relatively unresponsive to wage and unearned income if market work causes fatigue. Copyright 1994 by University of Chicago Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Suen, Wing & Mo, Pak Hung, 1994. "Simple Analytics of Productive Consumption," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 102(2), pages 372-383, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucp:jpolec:v:102:y:1994:i:2:p:372-83
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    File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/261936
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Lazear, Edward P, 1977. "Education: Consumption or Production?," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 85(3), pages 569-597, June.
    2. Pollak, Robert A & Wachter, Michael L, 1975. "The Relevance of the Household Production Function and Its Implications for the Allocation of Time," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 83(2), pages 255-277, April.
    3. Ehrlich, Isaac & Lui, Francis T, 1991. "Intergenerational Trade, Longevity, and Economic Growth," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 99(5), pages 1029-1059, October.
    4. Blomquist, N Soren, 1989. "Comparative Statics for Utility Maximization Models with Nonlinear Budget Constraints," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 30(2), pages 275-296, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Contoyannis, Paul & Jones, Andrew M., 2004. "Socio-economic status, health and lifestyle," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(5), pages 965-995, September.
    2. Hamermesh, Daniel S. & Meng, Xin & Zhang, Junsen, 2002. "Dress for success--does primping pay?," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 9(3), pages 361-373, July.
    3. Palmer-Jones, Richard & Jackson, Cecile, 1997. "Work intensity, gender and sustainable development," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 39-62, February.
    4. Mullahy, John & Sindelar, Jody, 1996. "Employment, unemployment, and problem drinking," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(4), pages 409-434, August.
    5. Chavas, Jean-Paul, 2013. "On the microeconomics of food and malnutrition under endogenous discounting," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 80-96.
    6. repec:spr:eurase:v:7:y:2017:i:1:d:10.1007_s40822-016-0059-4 is not listed on IDEAS

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