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Estimating labour supply elasticities under rationing: a structural model of time allocation behaviour

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  • Victoria Prowse

Abstract

This paper presents a structural model of the allocation of time to various non-market activities and market work by couples and single men and women. Parameters are estimated using a sample taken from the UK 2000 Time Use Survey. Own-wage effects are found to be positive for both men and women and are larger for cohabiting individuals than for singles. The presence of young children leads to a much larger increase in the time spent in home production by women than by men. However, the presence of young children causes men to increase their total time spent working by more than women.

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  • Victoria Prowse, 2009. "Estimating labour supply elasticities under rationing: a structural model of time allocation behaviour," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 42(1), pages 90-112, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:cje:issued:v:42:y:2009:i:1:p:90-112
    DOI: 10.1111/j.1540-5982.2008.01500.x
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    Cited by:

    1. Jorge González-Chapela, 2010. "Things that make us different: analysis of variance in the use of time," Working Papers. Serie AD 2010-18, Instituto Valenciano de Investigaciones Económicas, S.A. (Ivie).
    2. Kawaguchi, Daiji & Lee, Jungmin & Hamermesh, Daniel S., 2013. "A gift of time," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 24(C), pages 205-216.
    3. Shigeru Matsumoto, 2014. "Spouses’ time allocation to pro-environmental activities: who is saving the environment at home?," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 12(1), pages 159-176, March.
    4. Shigeru Matsumoto, 2014. "The Opportunity Cost of Pro-Environmental Activities: Spending Time to Promote the Environment," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 35(1), pages 119-130, March.

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C34 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Truncated and Censored Models; Switching Regression Models
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply

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