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Relaxing Intertemporal Separability: A Rational Habits Model of Labor Supply Estimated from Panel Data

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  • Bover, Olympia

Abstract

This article relaxes the assumption of separability of preferences over time that, although implausible, is usually maintained in life-cycle labor-supply models. An empirically tractable rational habits model is specified and estimated on the basis of a ten-year sample of men from the Michigan Panel of Income Dynamics. The effect of past hours of work in determining current hours decisions is found to be very important and well determined, having allowed for permanent individual differences and for time effects. Copyright 1991 by University of Chicago Press.

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  • Bover, Olympia, 1991. "Relaxing Intertemporal Separability: A Rational Habits Model of Labor Supply Estimated from Panel Data," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 9(1), pages 85-100, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucp:jlabec:v:9:y:1991:i:1:p:85-100
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Abowd, John M & Card, David, 1987. "Intertemporal Labor Supply and Long-term Employment Contracts," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 77(1), pages 50-68, March.
    2. Ashenfelter, Orley, 1984. "Macroeconomic analyses and microeconomic analyses of labor supply," Carnegie-Rochester Conference Series on Public Policy, Elsevier, pages 117-156.
    3. Lillard, Lee & Smith, James P & Welch, Finis, 1986. "What Do We Really Know about Wages? The Importance of Nonreporting and Census Imputation," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 94(3), pages 489-506, June.
    4. Griliches, Zvi & Hausman, Jerry A., 1986. "Errors in variables in panel data," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 93-118, February.
    5. Orley Ashenfelter, 1984. "Macroeconomic Analyses and Microeconomic Analyses of Labor Supply," Working Papers 553, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
    6. Orley Ashenfelter & Gary Solon, 1982. "Longitudinal Labor Market Data: Sources, Uses, and Limitations," Working Papers 535, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
    7. Duncan, Greg J & Hill, Daniel H, 1985. "An Investigation of the Extent and Consequences of Measurement Error in Labor-Economic Survey Data," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 3(4), pages 508-532, October.
    8. Griliches, Zvi, 1974. "Errors in Variables and Other Unobservables," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 42(6), pages 971-998, November.
    9. repec:pri:indrel:dsp014m90dv50s is not listed on IDEAS
    10. repec:fth:prinin:155 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Mellow, Wesley & Sider, Hal, 1983. "Accuracy of Response in Labor Market Surveys: Evidence and Implications," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 1(4), pages 331-344, October.
    12. Altonji, Joseph G, 1986. "Intertemporal Substitution in Labor Supply: Evidence from Micro Data," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 94(3), pages 176-215, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Dinh, Huong & Strazdins, Lyndall & Welsh, Jennifer, 2017. "Hour-glass ceilings: Work-hour thresholds, gendered health inequities," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 176(C), pages 42-51.
    2. Fève, Patrick & Matheron, Julien, 2005. "Can the Kydland-Prescott Model Pass the Cogley-Nason Test?," IDEI Working Papers 350, Institut d'Économie Industrielle (IDEI), Toulouse.
    3. Victoria Prowse, 2012. "Modeling Employment Dynamics With State Dependence and Unobserved Heterogeneity," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 30(3), pages 411-431, April.
    4. Wang, Mei-Hui & Huang, Tai-Hsin, 2007. "A study on the persistence of Farrell's efficiency measure under a dynamic framework," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 180(3), pages 1302-1316, August.
    5. Dupaigne, Martial & Fève, Patrick & Matheron, Julien, 2005. "Technology Shocks and Employment: Do We Really Need DSGE Models with a Fall in Hours?," IDEI Working Papers 349, Institut d'Économie Industrielle (IDEI), Toulouse.
    6. Lefebvre, Pierre & Merrigan, Philip & Verstraete, Matthieu, 2009. "Dynamic labour supply effects of childcare subsidies: Evidence from a Canadian natural experiment on low-fee universal child care," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(5), pages 490-502, October.
    7. James P. Ziliak & Thomas J. Kniesner, 1999. "Estimating Life Cycle Labor Supply Tax Effects," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 107(2), pages 326-359, April.
    8. Sarafidis, Vasilis & Yamagata, Takashi, 2010. "Instrumental Variable Estimation of Dynamic Linear Panel Data Models with Defactored Regressors under Cross-sectional Dependence," MPRA Paper 25182, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Hafedh Bouakez & Takashi Kano, 2006. "Learning-by-Doing or Habit Formation?," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 9(3), pages 508-524, July.
    10. Martial Dupaigne & Patrick Feve & Julien Matheron, 2007. "Technology Shocks, Non-stationary Hours and DSVAR," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 10(2), pages 238-255, April.
    11. Charles Brown & Greg J. Duncan & Frank P. Stafford, 1996. "Data Watch: The Panel Study of Income Dynamics," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 10(2), pages 155-168, Spring.
    12. Gary Wong, 2001. "Towards A More General Approach To Testing The Time Additivity Hypothesis," School of Economics and Finance Discussion Papers and Working Papers Series 098, School of Economics and Finance, Queensland University of Technology.
    13. Prowse, Victoria L., 2006. "Part-time Work and Occupational Attainment Amongst a Cohort of British Women," IZA Discussion Papers 2342, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    14. Rebecca M. Blank, 1994. "The Dynamics of Part-Time Work," NBER Working Papers 4911, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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