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Wage Growth and the Theory of Turnover

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  • Munasinghe, Lalith

Abstract

Theories of turnover and wage dynamics have studied the impact of wage levels on turnover, but they have failed explicitly to model the role of wage growth in predicting turnover. This article presents a theory of turnover that explains why within-job wage growth reduces the likelihood of worker-firm separations. The model determines the evolution of value among jobs that differ systematically in permanent rates of wage growth and shows that the value of high wage-growth jobs increases faster. With additional assumptions about the search process, this proposition implies that high wage-growth jobs are less likely to end. Copyright 2000 by University of Chicago Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Munasinghe, Lalith, 2000. "Wage Growth and the Theory of Turnover," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 18(2), pages 204-220, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucp:jlabec:v:18:y:2000:i:2:p:204-20
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Henneberger, Fred & Sousa-Poza, Alfonso, 2002. "Beweggründe und Determinanten zwischenbetrieblicher Mobilität: Die Schweiz in einer internationalen Perspektive (Motives and determinants of job-to-job mobility : Switzerland in an international persp," Mitteilungen aus der Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany], vol. 35(2), pages 205-231.
    2. Munasinghe, Lalith, 2006. "Expectations matter: Job prospects and turnover dynamics," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 13(5), pages 589-609, October.
    3. Davia, Maria A., 2005. "Job mobility and wage mobility at the beginning of the working career: a comparative view across Europe," ISER Working Paper Series 2005-03, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    4. Munasinghe, Lalith & Sicherman, Nachum, 2004. "Wage Dynamics and Unobserved Heterogeneity: Time Preference or Learning Ability?," IZA Discussion Papers 1436, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Rodrigo Taborda & Juan Carlos Guataqui, 2003. "Firm level evidence of efficiency wages and labor turnover in Colombia's manufacturing industry," BORRADORES DE INVESTIGACIÓN 002729, UNIVERSIDAD DEL ROSARIO.
    6. Pekka Ilmakunnas & Mika Maliranta, 2005. "Worker inflow, outflow, and churning," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(10), pages 1115-1133.
    7. Lalith Munasinghe & Nachum Sicherman, 2006. "Why Do Dancers Smoke? Smoking, Time Preference, and Wage Dynamics," Eastern Economic Journal, Eastern Economic Association, vol. 32(4), pages 595-616, Fall.
    8. Lalith Munasinghe, 2005. "A Theory of Wage and Turnover Dynamics," 2005 Meeting Papers 924, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    9. Munasinghe, Lalith & Sigman, Karl, 2004. "A hobo syndrome? Mobility, wages, and job turnover," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 11(2), pages 191-218, April.
    10. repec:iab:iabmit:v:35:i:2:p:205-231 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Pagura, Maria E., 2002. "The Hazard Of Client Exit In Microfinance," 2002 Annual meeting, July 28-31, Long Beach, CA 19698, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    12. Pavlopoulos, Dimitris & Fouarge, Didier & Muffels, Ruud & Vermunt, Jeroen K., 2007. "Who benefits from a job change: The dwarfs or the giants?," IRISS Working Paper Series 2007-16, IRISS at CEPS/INSTEAD.

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