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The Supply of Child Care Labor

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  • Blau, David M

Abstract

This article presents estimates of the elasticity of supply of labor to child care. This parameter is an important determinant of the effects of child-care subsidies and regulations on the cost of child care. Using data from the Current Population Survey, there is evidence of an elasticity in the range of 1.2-1.9. This implies that the majority of the benefits of child-care subsidies accrue to consumers of child care. It is also consistent with the fact that child-care workers' wages remained flat in real terms in recent years, despite rapid growth in the demand for child care. Copyright 1993 by University of Chicago Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Blau, David M, 1993. "The Supply of Child Care Labor," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 11(2), pages 324-347, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucp:jlabec:v:11:y:1993:i:2:p:324-47
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Randal Heeb & M. Rebecca Kilburn, 2004. "The Effects of State Regulations on Childcare Prices and Choices," Working Papers WR-137-NICHD, RAND Corporation.
    2. Rachel Gordon & P. Chase-Lansdale, 2001. "Availability of child care in the United States: A description and analysis of data sources," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 38(2), pages 299-316, May.
    3. Tom Kornstad & Thor Thoresen, 2007. "A discrete choice model for labor supply and childcare," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 20(4), pages 781-803, October.
    4. Bassok, Daphna & Fitzpatrick, Maria & Loeb, Susanna, 2014. "Does state preschool crowd-out private provision? The impact of universal preschool on the childcare sector in Oklahoma and Georgia," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 83(C), pages 18-33.
    5. Randal Heeb & M. Rebecca Kilburn, 2004. "The Effects of State Regulations on Childcare Prices and Choices," Working Papers 137, RAND Corporation.
    6. Blau, David & Currie, Janet, 2006. "Pre-School, Day Care, and After-School Care: Who's Minding the Kids?," Handbook of the Economics of Education, Elsevier.
    7. H. Naci Mocan, 1995. "The Child Care Industry: Cost Functions, Efficiency, and Quality," NBER Working Papers 5293, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Herbst, Chris M., 2015. "The Rising Cost of Child Care in the United States: A Reassessment of the Evidence," IZA Discussion Papers 9072, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    9. Chikako Yamauchi, 2010. "The availability of child care centers, perceived search costs and parental life satisfaction," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 8(2), pages 231-253, June.
    10. David M. Blau & H. Naci Mocan, 2002. "The Supply Of Quality In Child Care Centers," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 84(3), pages 483-496, August.
    11. Jutta M. Joesch & C. Katharina Spiess, 2002. "European Mothers' Time with Children: Differences and Similarities across Nine Countries," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 305, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    12. David M. Blau, 2003. "Do child care regulations affect the child care and labor markets?," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 22(3), pages 443-465.
    13. H. Naci Mocan & Deborah Viola, 1997. "The Determinants of Child Care Workers' Wages and Compensation: Sectoral Differences, Human Capital, Race, Insiders and Outsiders," NBER Working Papers 6328, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    14. Edwards, John H. Y. & Fuller, Bruce & Liang, Xiaoyan, 1996. "The mixed preschool market: Explaining local variation in family demand and organized supply," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 15(2), pages 149-161, April.
    15. Katharina Spieß & Wolfgang Tietze, 2001. "Gütesiegel als neues Instrument der Qualitätssicherung von Humandienstleistungen: Gründe, Anforderungen und Umsetzungsüberlegungen am Beispiel von Kindertageseinrichtungen," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 243, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    16. Heinrich Hock & Delia Furtado, 2009. "Female Work and Fertility in the United States: Effects of Low-Skilled Immigrant Labor," Working papers 2009-20, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics.

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