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Does Trade Credit Boost Firm Performance?

Author

Listed:
  • Dongya Li
  • Yi Lu
  • Travis Ng
  • Jun Yang

Abstract

Some firms have achieved good performance in developing countries where the financial sector is far from established. One explanation in the literature is that these firms benefit from trade credit, a form of informal financing. Using a survey of firms in China conducted by the World Bank in early 2003, this article examines whether trade credit indeed boosts firm performance. Our ordinary least squares results show that trade credit is significantly and positively correlated with firm performance. However, using the instrumental variable approach to address endogeneity, we find that the statistical significance disappears. The results are robust to a series of robustness checks, casting doubt on the claim that trade credit boosts firm performance.

Suggested Citation

  • Dongya Li & Yi Lu & Travis Ng & Jun Yang, 2016. "Does Trade Credit Boost Firm Performance?," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 64(3), pages 573-602.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucp:ecdecc:doi:10.1086/685764
    DOI: 10.1086/685764
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Lifang Hu & Rigoberto A. Lopez & Yinchu Zeng, 2019. "The impact of credit constraints on the performance of Chinese agricultural wholesalers," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 51(35), pages 3864-3875, July.
    2. Dary, Stanley K. & James, Harvey S., 2019. "Does investment in trade credit matter for profitability? Evidence from publicly listed agro-food firms," Research in International Business and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 237-250.
    3. Afrifa, Godfred Adjapong & Gyapong, Ernest & Monem, Reza M., 2018. "Product differentiation, market dynamics and the value relevance of trade payables: Evidence from UK listed firms," Journal of Contemporary Accounting and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(3), pages 235-253.

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