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Measures of Technology and the Business Cycle

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  • Annika Alexius

    (Uppsala University)

  • Mikael Carlsson

    (Uppsala University)

Abstract

We analyze the technology shocks identified by two different structural VAR models and compare them with classical and refined Solow residuals. The measures of technology are reasonably highly correlated. Alternative identifying restrictions in the VARs, however, have different theoretical as well as empirical consequences for the technology shocks. King et al.'s (1991) model and the classical Solow residual capture a mixture of technology and labor supply shocks, whereas the technology shocks from Galí's model and the refined Solow residuals are robust to the latter phenomenon. Moreover, we find that the two robust measures of technology are negatively correlated with hours worked. © 2005 President and Fellows of Harvard College and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Suggested Citation

  • Annika Alexius & Mikael Carlsson, 2005. "Measures of Technology and the Business Cycle," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 87(2), pages 299-307, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:tpr:restat:v:87:y:2005:i:2:p:299-307
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    Cited by:

    1. Lundborg, Per, 2005. "Wage Fairness, Growth and the Utilization of R&D Workers," Working Paper Series 206, Trade Union Institute for Economic Research.
    2. Jürgen Janger & Werner Hölzl & Serguei Kaniovski & Johannes Kutsam & Michael Peneder & Andreas Reinstaller & Susanne Sieber & Isabel Stadler & Fabian Unterlass, 2011. "Structural Change and the Competitiveness of EU Member States," WIFO Studies, WIFO, number 42956, August.
    3. Mikael Carlsson & Jon Smedsaas, 2007. "Technology Shocks and the Labor‐Input Response: Evidence from Firm‐Level Data," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 39(6), pages 1509-1520, September.
    4. Holmlund, Bertil & Alexius, Annika, 2008. "Monetary Policy and Swedish Unemployment Fluctuations," Economics - The Open-Access, Open-Assessment E-Journal, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW), vol. 2, pages 1-25.
    5. Yongsung Chang & Jay H. Hong, 2006. "Do Technological Improvements in the Manufacturing Sector Raise or Lower Employment?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 96(1), pages 352-368, March.
    6. Morten O. Ravn & Saverio Simonelli, 2007. "Labor Market Dynamics and the Business Cycle: Structural Evidence for the United States," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 109(4), pages 743-777, December.
    7. Alexius, Annika & Post, Erik, 2006. "Cointegration and the stabilizing role of exchange rates," Working Paper Series 2006:8, Uppsala University, Department of Economics.
    8. Lundborg, Per, 2005. "Wage Theories for the Swedish Labour Market," Working Paper Series 207, Trade Union Institute for Economic Research.
    9. Bucht, Charlotte & Gottfries, Nils & Lundin, Magnus, 2002. "Why Don't Prices Fall in a Recession? Financial Constraints, Investment, and Customer Relations," Working Paper Series 2002:3, Uppsala University, Department of Economics.
    10. Francesco Furlanetto & Martin Seneca, 2012. "Rule-of-Thumb Consumers, Productivity, and Hours," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 114(2), pages 658-679, June.
    11. Annika Alexius & Erik Post, 2008. "Exchange rates and asymmetric shocks in small open economies," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 35(3), pages 527-541, November.
    12. Werner Hölzl & Serguei Kaniovski & Andreas Reinstaller, 2015. "The exposure of technology and knowledge intense sectors to the business cycle," Bulletin of Applied Economics, Risk Market Journals, vol. 2(1), pages 1-19.
    13. Magnus Lundin & Nils Gottfries & Charlotte Bucht & Tomas Lindström, 2009. "Price and Investment Dynamics: Theory and Plant‐Level Data," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 41(5), pages 907-934, August.
    14. Selén, Jan & Ståhlberg, Ann-Charlotte, 2004. "Wage and Compensation Inequality — How Different?," Working Paper Series 197, Trade Union Institute for Economic Research.
    15. Takuji Fueki & Takuji Kawamoto, 2008. "Does Information Technology Raise Japan's Productivity?," Bank of Japan Working Paper Series 08-E-8, Bank of Japan.
    16. Alexius, Annika, 2005. "Productivity shocks and real exchange rates," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(3), pages 555-566, April.
    17. Forslund, Anders & Gottfries, Nils & Westermark, Andreas, 2005. "Real and nominal wage adjustment in open economies," Working Paper Series 2005:23, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
    18. Ko, Jun-Hyung & Kwon, Hyeog Ug, 2015. "Do technology shocks lower hours worked? – Evidence from Japanese industry level data," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 138-157.
    19. Fueki, Takuji & Kawamoto, Takuji, 2009. "Does information technology raise Japan's productivity?," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 21(4), pages 325-336, December.
    20. Holzl, Werner & Reinstaller, Andreas, 2007. "The impact of productivity and demand shocks on structural dynamics: Evidence from Austrian manufacturing," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 18(2), pages 145-166, June.
    21. Andrew Young & William Shughart, 2010. "The consequences of the US DOJ’s antitrust activities: A macroeconomic perspective," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 142(3), pages 409-422, March.
    22. Yongsung Chang & Jay H. Hong, 2003. "On the Employment Effect of Technology: Evidence from US Manufacturing for 1958-1996," PIER Working Paper Archive 03-004, Penn Institute for Economic Research, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania.

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    JEL classification:

    • C32 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes; State Space Models
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles

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