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Ordered Choices and Heterogeneity in Attribute Processing

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  • William H. Greene
  • David A. Hensher

Abstract

A growing number of empirical studies involve the assessment of influences on a choice amongst ordered discrete alternatives. Ordered logit and probit models are well known, including extensions to accommodate random parameters and heteroscedasticity in unobserved variance. This paper extends the ordered choice random parameter model to permit random parameterisation of thresholds and decomposition to establish observed sources of systematic variation in the threshold parameter distribution. We illustrate the empirical gains of this model, over the traditional ordered choice model, by identifying candidate influences on the role that specific attributes play, in the sense of being ignored or not (including being aggregated where they are in common-metric units), in an individual's choice amongst unlabelled attribute packages of alternative tolled and non-tolled routes for the commuting trip. The empirical ordering represents the number of attributes attended to from the full fixed set. The evidence suggests that there is significant heterogeneity associated with the thresholds, that can be connected to systematic sources associated with the respondent (that is, gender) and the choice experiment, and hence the generalised extension of the ordered choice model is an improvement, behaviourally, over the simpler model. © 2010 LSE and the University of Bath

Suggested Citation

  • William H. Greene & David A. Hensher, 2010. "Ordered Choices and Heterogeneity in Attribute Processing," Journal of Transport Economics and Policy, University of Bath, vol. 44(3), pages 331-364, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:tpe:jtecpo:v:44:y:2010:i:3:p:331-364
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Lahiri, Kajal & Zhao, Yongchen, 2015. "Quantifying survey expectations: A critical review and generalization of the Carlson–Parkin method," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 51-62.
    2. repec:jss:jstsof:v:074:i10 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Grebitus, Carola & Seitz, Carolin, 2014. "Relationship between attention and choice making," 2014 International Congress, August 26-29, 2014, Ljubljana, Slovenia 182669, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
    4. Tsegay Gebrekidan Tekleselassie, 2017. "Subjective Wellbeing and Institutions: The Case of Rural Ethiopia," Working Papers 016, Ethiopian Development Research Institute.
    5. Falco, Paolo & Maloney, William F. & Rijkers, Bob & Sarrias, Mauricio, 2015. "Heterogeneity in subjective wellbeing: An application to occupational allocation in Africa," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 111(C), pages 137-153.
    6. Richard Yao & Riccardo Scarpa & John Rose & James Turner, 2015. "Experimental Design Criteria and Their Behavioural Efficiency: An Evaluation in the Field," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 62(3), pages 433-455, November.
    7. Paleti, Rajesh & Bhat, Chandra R., 2013. "The composite marginal likelihood (CML) estimation of panel ordered-response models," Journal of choice modelling, Elsevier, vol. 7(C), pages 24-43.
    8. Tekleselassie, Tsegay Gebrekidan, 2016. "Three essays on the impact of institutions and policies on socio-economic outcomes," Economics PhD Theses 1316, Department of Economics, University of Sussex.
    9. repec:kap:transp:v:44:y:2017:i:5:d:10.1007_s11116-016-9696-4 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Fischer, Anke & Glenk, Klaus, 2011. "One model fits all? -- On the moderating role of emotional engagement and confusion in the elicitation of preferences for climate change adaptation policies," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(6), pages 1178-1188, April.
    11. David Hensher, 2014. "Attribute processing as a behavioural strategy in choice making," Chapters,in: Handbook of Choice Modelling, chapter 12, pages 268-289 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    12. Kajal Lahiri & Yongchen Zhao, 2013. "Quantifying Heterogeneous Survey Expectations: The Carlson-Parkin Method Revisited," Discussion Papers 13-08, University at Albany, SUNY, Department of Economics.

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