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An examination of regional interaction and super-regions in Britain: An error correction model approach

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  • David Gray

Abstract

Gray D. (2005) An examination of regional interaction and super-regions in Britain: an error correction model approach, Regional Studies 39 , 619-632. This paper examines spill-over effects among regions. Estimating error correction models of British rates of unemployment and conducting Granger-causality tests, it is found that, on a short-run basis, the West Midlands is a leading territory within a closely knit group of surrounding regions. The paper draws a distinction between a core and a leading region, suggesting the core region, the South East, is a follower, responding to, and magnifying, economic fluctuations. The policy implications are that current regional delineations may not be consistent with the demands of economic coherence at the national level and so is not optimal for the delivery of decentralized spatial economic policy. Indeed, as economic engineering in the high unemployment periphery has consequences for more prosperous areas, it may be better not to allow local administrators too much autonomy as the benefits of a better economic focus may be out-weighed by destabilizing tendencies that decentralization may impose on the whole system. This problem has consequences for, and may be compounded by, policy initiatives at the European level.

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  • David Gray, 2005. "An examination of regional interaction and super-regions in Britain: An error correction model approach," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 39(5), pages 619-632.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:regstd:v:39:y:2005:i:5:p:619-632
    DOI: 10.1080/00343400500151889
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Alexiadis, Stilianos & Eleftheriou, Konstantinos, 2010. "The Morphology of Income Convergence in US States: New Evidence using an Error-Correction-Model," MPRA Paper 20096, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Richard Harris & John Moffat & Victoria Kravtsova, 2011. "In Search of ‘ W ’," Spatial Economic Analysis, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 6(3), pages 249-270, February.
    3. Stilianos Alexiadis & Konstantinos Eleftheriou & Peter Nijkamp, 2013. "Do Income Disparities dissipate across the US States? Experimenting with a Vector Error Correction Model," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 13-165/VIII, Tinbergen Institute.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Regional policy; Regional unemployment rates; Granger-causality; Error correction models; Overspill; Super-regions; European economic policy areas; Politique regionale; Taux de chomage regionaux; Causalite du type Granger; Modeles de correction pour l'erreur Retombees; Super-regions; Zones de politique economique europennes; Regionalpolitik; regionale Erwerbslosenraten; Grangersche Kausalitat; Modelle zur Irrtumsberichtigung; Bevolkerungsuberschuss; Supraregionen Gebiete der europaischen Wirtschaftspolitik; Politica regional; Tasas regionales de desempleo; Causalidad de Granger; Modelos de correccion de errores; Desbordamiento; Super regiones; Areas de politica economica europeas; JEL classifications: H77; R12; R15; R58;

    JEL classification:

    • H77 - Public Economics - - State and Local Government; Intergovernmental Relations - - - Intergovernmental Relations; Federalism
    • R12 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Size and Spatial Distributions of Regional Economic Activity; Interregional Trade (economic geography)
    • R15 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Econometric and Input-Output Models; Other Methods
    • R58 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Regional Government Analysis - - - Regional Development Planning and Policy

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