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The True Scale of the Regional Problem in the UK

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  • Stephen Fothergill

Abstract

This article argues that the scale of unemployment in the UK, and the differences between regions, are severely understated by claimant unemployment data. It explains how unemployment becomes 'hidden', in particular by a major diversion of older and less healthy workers from unemployment-related benefits, and how this process is especially marked in the traditional industrial parts of northern Britain. The true scale of regional differences in joblessness is also underlined by employment rates in different parts of the country.

Suggested Citation

  • Stephen Fothergill, 2001. "The True Scale of the Regional Problem in the UK," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 35(3), pages 241-246.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:regstd:v:35:y:2001:i:3:p:241-246
    DOI: 10.1080/00343400123960
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. John Sutherland, 1999. "Further reflections on hidden unemployment: An examination of the off-flows from the claimant count in the North West of England," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 33(5), pages 465-476.
    2. David Armstrong, 1999. "Hidden Male Unemployment in Northern Ireland," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 33(6), pages 499-511.
    3. R R MacKay, 1999. "Work and nonwork: a more difficult labour market," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 31(11), pages 1919-1934, November.
    4. A. E. Green, 1999. "Insights into unemployment and non-employment in Europe using alternative measures," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 33(5), pages 453-464.
    5. Christina Beatty & Stephen Fothergill, 1996. "Labour Market Adjustment in Areas of Chronic Industrial Decline: The Case of the UK Coalfields," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 30(7), pages 627-640.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Stephen Drinkwater, 2015. "Informal Caring and Labour Market Outcomes Within England and Wales," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 49(2), pages 273-286, February.
    2. Maja Prudzienica, 2012. "Disabled Persons on Labour Market - Analysis of Solutions in Poland and Selected EU Countries," MIC 2012: Managing Transformation with Creativity; Proceedings of the 13th International Conference, Budapest, 22–24 November 2012 [Selected Papers], University of Primorska, Faculty of Management Koper.
    3. Duncan McVicar, 2006. "Why do disability benefit rolls vary between regions? A review of the evidence from the USA and the UK," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 40(5), pages 519-533.
    4. Robert Dixon, 2007. "Regional Differences in the Severity of Recessions in the UK," Department of Economics - Working Papers Series 1009, The University of Melbourne.
    5. Kevin Morgan, 2002. "English Question: Regional Perspectives on a Fractured Nation," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(7), pages 797-810.
    6. Stephen Drinkwater, 2003. "Estimating the willingness to move within Great Britain: Importance and implications," School of Economics Discussion Papers 1203, School of Economics, University of Surrey.
    7. Christina Beatty & Stephen Fothergill, 2002. "Hidden Unemployment Among Men: A Case Study," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(8), pages 811-823.
    8. Andrew E. Burke & Michael A. Nolan & Felix R. FitzRoy, 2006. "Education and Regional Job Creation by the Self-Employed: The English North-South Divide," Papers on Entrepreneurship, Growth and Public Policy 2006-07, Max Planck Institute of Economics, Entrepreneurship, Growth and Public Policy Group.
    9. Tangian, Andranik S., 2005. "Composite indicator of German regional policy and its use for optimizing subsidies to regional labour markets," WSI Working Papers 138, The Institute of Economic and Social Research (WSI), Hans-Böckler-Foundation.
    10. Wouter Vermeulen, 2005. "Regional disparities in a small country? An assessment of the regional dimension to the Dutch labour market on the basis of regional unemployment and participation differentials," ERSA conference papers ersa05p207, European Regional Science Association.
    11. Peter Johnson, 2005. "Targeting Firm Births and Economic Regeneration in a Lagging Region," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 24(5), pages 451-464, June.
    12. Stephen Drinkwater & David Blackaby, 2004. "Migration and Labour Market Differences: The Case of Wales," School of Economics Discussion Papers 0604, School of Economics, University of Surrey.
    13. Whittaker, W & Sutton, M, 2010. "Mental health, work incapacity and State transfers: an analysis of the British Household Panel Survey," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 10/21, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    14. O'Leary, Nigel C. & Murphy, Philip D. & Latreille, Paul L. & Blackaby, David H. & Sloane, Peter J., 2005. "Accounting for Differences in Labour Market Outcomes in Great Britain: A Regional Analysis Using the Labour Force Survey," IZA Discussion Papers 1501, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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