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Does having more children increase the likelihood of parental smoking? Evidence from Vietnam

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  • Mohamed Arouri
  • Adel Ben-Youssef
  • Cuong Nguyen Viet

Abstract

Evidence has shown that parental smoking can cause health problems for children. It might be expected that parents who are aware of the harmful effects of second-hand smoke will reduce their smoking, especially as they have more children. However, based on instrumental variable regressions using data from the 2006 and 2008 Vietnam Household Living Standard Surveys, we find a strongly positive and significant effect of the number of children on the probability of tobacco smoking in households in Vietnam. An additional child increases the probability of tobacco consumption in the household by approximately 15%. These findings imply low levels of awareness of the harmful effects of second-hand smoke on children’s health in Vietnam, and indicate the need for policy action to disseminate knowledge on the harmful effects of smoking.

Suggested Citation

  • Mohamed Arouri & Adel Ben-Youssef & Cuong Nguyen Viet, 2017. "Does having more children increase the likelihood of parental smoking? Evidence from Vietnam," Oxford Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(3), pages 260-275, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:oxdevs:v:45:y:2017:i:3:p:260-275
    DOI: 10.1080/13600818.2016.1193129
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1080/13600818.2016.1193129
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    References listed on IDEAS

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