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Agricultural labour and the incidence of surplus labour: experience from China during reform

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  • Fung Kwan

Abstract

This paper contributes to the pool of studies of rural underemployment and revisits a number of estimates of surplus agricultural labour in China. The study is devoted to the conceptualization, identification and measurement of surplus at regional, provincial and national levels by a stochastic frontier functional specification. The analysis indicates that the existing size of agricultural surplus labour is still significantly large with the continued practice of the household registration system and China's WTO membership.

Suggested Citation

  • Fung Kwan, 2009. "Agricultural labour and the incidence of surplus labour: experience from China during reform," Journal of Chinese Economic and Business Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 7(3), pages 341-361.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:jocebs:v:7:y:2009:i:3:p:341-361
    DOI: 10.1080/14765280903073215
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Barry Naughton, 2007. "The Chinese Economy: Transitions and Growth," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262640643.
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    Cited by:

    1. Andersson, Fredrik N.G. & Edgerton, David L. & Opper, Sonja, 2013. "A Matter of Time: Revisiting Growth Convergence in China," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 239-251.
    2. Wenlang Zhang & Gaofeng Han, 2013. "How have Labour Market Developments Affected Labour Costs in China?," Working Papers 072013, Hong Kong Institute for Monetary Research.
    3. Knight, John & Deng, Quheng & Li, Shi, 2011. "The puzzle of migrant labour shortage and rural labour surplus in China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 22(4), pages 585-600.
    4. Chang, Hongqin & Dong, Xiao-yuan & MacPhail, Fiona, 2011. "Labor Migration and Time Use Patterns of the Left-behind Children and Elderly in Rural China," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 39(12), pages 2199-2210.
    5. Prema-chandra Athukorala & Zheng Wei, 2015. "Economic Transition and Labour Market Dynamics in China: An Interpretative Survey of the ‘Turning Point’ Debate," Departmental Working Papers 2015-06, The Australian National University, Arndt-Corden Department of Economics.
    6. Xiaobing Wang & Jenifer Piesse & Nick Weaver, 2013. "Mind the gaps: a political economy of the multiple dimensions of China's rural–urban divide," Asian-Pacific Economic Literature, Asia Pacific School of Economics and Government, The Australian National University, vol. 27(2), pages 52-67, November.
    7. Xiaobing Wang & Jenifer Piesse & Nick Weaver, 2011. "Mind the gaps: a political economy of the multiple dimensions of China’s rural–urban divide," Global Development Institute Working Paper Series 15211, GDI, The University of Manchester.
    8. Gaofeng Han & Wenlang Zhang, 2015. "How have Labour Market Developments Affected Labour Costs in China?," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 38(9), pages 1387-1408, September.

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