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Key Factors of Recent Chinese Provincial Economic Growth

  • Mario Biggeri

The aim of this paper is to analyse the factors that affected Chinese provincial economic growth after the reforms of the early 1980s, through a panel analysis (period 1986-2001). The production function approach focuses on human capital, 'space-serving' infrastructure, sectoral allocation of labour and institutional changes. Indices relevant for the analysis are elaborated and provincial capital stocks are estimated. The empirical results indicate the positive role of capital stock, human capital and physical infrastructure and underline that sectoral allocation of labour and institutional changes affected the level of aggregate output. A redistribution policy in favour of the inland provinces needs to be implemented so that human capital and infrastructure can be enhanced, bottlenecks can be overcome and investment can be attracted.

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Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Journal of Chinese Economic and Business Studies.

Volume (Year): 1 (2003)
Issue (Month): 2 ()
Pages: 159-183

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Handle: RePEc:taf:jocebs:v:1:y:2003:i:2:p:159-183
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