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The FDI-Income Growth Nexus: a review of the Chinese experience

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Abstract

Amongst many economists, China serves as the foremost example of the benefits that developing countries can derive from being open to foreign direct investment (FDI). Since the early 1990s, China has, by a large margin, received more FDI than any other developing country. It has also experienced the world�s fastest rates of income growth. Moreover, those provinces within China that have hosted the bulk of FDI have grown at relatively faster rates. However, a literature has now emerged that makes it possible to better assess the relationship between FDI and income growth beyond these stylised facts. A review of this literature leads to the conclusion that China�s FDI-income growth nexus is in need of considerable qualification. The paper then attempts to reconcile the perception that FDI has been an important driver of income growth on the one hand with the limited evidence to that effect on the other. By way of conclusion, policy implications consequent to the review of literature are drawn.

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  • James Laurenceson & Kam Ki Tang, "undated". "The FDI-Income Growth Nexus: a review of the Chinese experience," EAERG Discussion Paper Series 0905, School of Economics, University of Queensland, Australia.
  • Handle: RePEc:qld:uqeaer:09
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    Cited by:

    1. Ying Xu, 2009. "How does financial system efficiency affect the growth impact of FDI in China?," Asia Pacific Economic Papers 383, Australia-Japan Research Centre, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
    2. Ying Xu, 2012. "How does financial system efficiency affect the growth impact of FDI in China?: Evidence from provincial data 1999-2006," China Finance Review International, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 2(2), pages 406-428, August.
    3. A. Yasemin Yalta, 2011. "New Evidence on FDI-Led Growth: The Case of China," Working Papers 1107, TOBB University of Economics and Technology, Department of Economics.
    4. Yalta, A. Yasemin, 2013. "Revisiting the FDI-led growth Hypothesis: The case of China," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 31(C), pages 335-343.

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